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ironfroggy

software/hardware rendered mixing

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Im working on my engine and certain things are software rendered and others supported by hardware. I will essentially i have multiple rendered images per frame. What I need is a way to put them together. how?

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Its my understanding that if DX can render in hardware, it will, and otherwise it''ll just use software. Basically DX should know the different automatically on whether to use hardware or software. Or is that not right? Its been a while, but it sounds good to me, or at least thats what i remember.

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well, yes that is true. but it doesnt help..
for one, im using openGL as well (for the linux version)
for two, im rendering things that directX has never heard of. so... yea

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It is possible to mix software rendering with hardware rendering as many Adventure/Adventuresque games do it (ex. Final Fantasy VII/VIII, Grim Fandango, Escape from Monkey Island.) I just don't know if it can be done realtime. How does it work? Erg, beats me I think I read some where that you have to play around with the back-buffer, but I'm not entirely sure of that. Hmm, why do they never show this type of trick in those Graphics Programming books?

Edited by - SonicSilcion on January 26, 2001 12:03:25 AM

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Guest Anonymous Poster

Well, the theory is easy: you need a zbuffer of your software rendered scene, then you just merge the two images by doing the zbuffer compare ''by hand''.
The problem is: this is awfully slow. You should use the zbuffer compare of your 3d hardware to do this. One way is to copy your software rendered image into the backbuffer, while the pixel pipeline of your hardware accelerator is enabled.
You need to supply rgb and z values for every pixel, an additional alpha if you want to alphablend.
Another way would be textures with a z component. This is very fast, but I''m not aware of any non-SGI, consumer level 3D hardware supporting this

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a few things really...

a have found ways to render curves without any compex mathematics or spliting them into multiple flat surfaces, as well as techniques to render hair and thin strands easily (maybe this one is already used tho, i dunno) and also a very nifty thing that is kinda secret right now... basically it just involves the need to take multiple objects rendered seperatly and put them all into the final buffer (or any surface i guess)

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