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Zero1

PLEASE read this!! Info needed BADLY!!

5 posts in this topic

BAD API's : You can do it better ? Then try out. These API's aren't written by any lame junior coders, they're really fast and take the simple stuff away from you.

DEVELOPMENT TOOLS : Didn't you need a DOS-compiler, too ? What else do you need ? Maybe graphics-software, but that was expensive for DOS, too. So, what else ?

REFERENCES : For OpenGL you could download the OpenGL Programming Guide, it's quite good. For DirectX, have a look at the SDK documentation. For C++ buy a book, it's better, for example "Visual C++ for Dummies", "C++ for Dummies" oder "C for Dummies" ... there are some other good books ... and "Windows Game Programming for Dummies" is good.

CU

------------------
Skullpture Entertainment
#40842461

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Just to clear some things up:

I don't even think I can write an API the equal of OPENGL, let alone better it, and I'm sorry if my message was misunderstood. What I meant was that since they were written by others, there's no way I can use them without the proper documentation... and that's what I'm asking for. Sorry if the first post offended anyone- I don't like ticking people off.

What I wanted was a link or two to a location on the Web where I could get refs for the following API's: Directx, openGL, and the windows API. I really appreciate the book recommendations, but they are very hard to find where I live. Thanks for reading.

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So far, the best site I have seen on MFC and to a lesser extent the Windows API in general is at http://www.codeguru.com
There's even three open source DirectX/MFC games in one of their download sections.

Quite honestly I don't see why people have such a problem with MFC, other than the obvious fact that it is a Microsoft thing. True, it can bloat your code if used incorrectly, but when used correctly it makes the creation of interfaces very fast. Personally, anything that makes my job easier is something I will use.

-fel

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Try Microsoft's developers site (http://msdn.mircosoft.com) for information on DirectX and Win32. Also, look in the Resources section here for some links to sites with free online books, and the programming reference section for tutorials on various topics (which, btw, is growing daily, so if there is not an article on a subject you are interested in there now, it will likely be there soon).
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You might want to check and see if amazon.com delivers to Nigeria.
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Hey there! I'm a fine example of a victim of the windows rush.... and I'll explain why and tell you guys how you can help me... If you can spare the time, that is...

Although I'm still relatively young, I am nonetheless of the old-school, because my first game programming escapades were on the BBC micro way back in 1990 when I first became infatuated with games. I later graduated to DOS and buried my head into it.. thus missing out on the windows 'revolution' for a number of reasons:

1) As I said, I'm quite young (19 this year) and so at that time, I was firmly under the financial control of a pair of computer-hating parents. "Get away from that keyboard and face your studies! You'll gain nothing from wasting your time with..." you get the idea.

2) I HATE WINDOWS!!!!! Anything that forces me to abide by a set of rules administered by a buggy OS is enough to make me scream...

The point of it all? simple.

DOS was cool because when I needed somehing I sat down and wrote it, not caring to bother my parents for any cash to buy 'development tools' and so on (which are non-existent in my country anyway), but now I need to sit down and learn the structure of a gigantic API written by programmers I'll probably never meet. These are all out of my reach, so I was wondering if the web could be of any use. Does anyone know where I can find references ( I don't really need tutorials, though they will be appreciated ) and/or structure charts for all these newfangled API's that know nothing about? I mean OPENGL, DIRECTX, WIN32, MFC (shudder), and the rest of them.

if you do decide to help me,

THANK YOU!!


and even if you don't, thanks for reading thru the post.

See ya!
............Zero1


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