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Guest Anonymous Poster

VB or VC++??

5 posts in this topic

If I were you, I would go with VC++ because you will be familiar with the language. VB and VC++ both have advantages, such as:

VB: Easy to learn
VC++: Fairly easy to learn (easy if you already know the language), more powerful than VB

They both have the visual advantage, allowing you to drag and drop controls, resize the form, and all things visual, well, visually - letting the program figure out all that code for you.

Summary: Get VC++ if you can, at least in my opinion.

-Eon

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If you're going to work on a small game (a Tetris-like or something like that), you can probably go with VB. For anything bigger, I'd suggest using VC++, as it's 5 times or so faster than VB. Of course, it's C++ and therefore more "tricky" than VB. Also, and unless you plan on working with DirectX 7, I believe there's no DirectX libraries for VB (I might be wring on that).

One last thing: forget the MFC in VC++ for making games. It's way too slow.

This is of course a personnal advice and other people could tell you something totally different.

Hope this helps (and please forgive my poor english).

MuteAngel

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Having used both VB and VC I'll share my opinion. If you want to do 3D programming use VC++ for it's operators, overloading, classes, pointers and data manipulation. If you want to make a basic windows prog. use VB, otherwise you can try using VC++'s MFC.
VC will do the job, if you find it slow (you shouldn't) try adding your own asm, but usually the compiler's asm is pretty good.
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If you already have experience coding in c/c++, I could not in conscience recommend Visual Basic as a programming platform.

Certainly, it is easy to learn and a very rapid development platform for simple graphical interfaces. The downside to this, however, is that it becomes very difficult to do anything outside of the given scope of the language.

Trying to implement a binary tree to find an optimal huffman encoding of a short string required representing the tree as a string in prefix notation. You can imagine the speed loss traversing this tree (The strings involved were short, and disk operations meant that the delay was transparent, but this isn't always the case).

To cut a long story short, I would recommend Visual C++, mostly because of its power, reliability and extendibility.

White Fire

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well I've used both.... I'd say for things like database spreadsheets wordprossesers ect. I might go with VB(I know c/c++ better than VB) but for ANY THING that requires speed ANY kind of speed(like a game) I'd use vc++.

as far as visual design there about the same but VB is slightly better(in my opinion).

------------------
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Words Of Wisdom:
"Never Stick A Pretzel In Your Butt It Might Break Off In There."


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I have already learned c/c++ but I now want to work on windows programming. But I'm not sure whether I should go with VC++(visual c++) or VB(Visual Basic). I have been asking around but no one can really give me a straight answer! I would like to know how user friendly and how "visual" the actually programming environment is, how much actual writing of code is done as opposed to visually creating the program and over all how powerful each one is. Several people have told me to go with VB as they say it is really easy to use and is very powerful, but I want to make the right decision. Any info on either or both compilers would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!!
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