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The diffrence between Game Design, and Game Programming?

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Whats the diffrence between Game Design, and Game Programming? I know what Game Programmers do, but what exactly does the game designers do? Whats it like a day in the life of a game designer? Which one is easier to pursue a carerr in? The reason I ask is that im about to enroll and im not to sure which of these I want to go for any help is well appreciated..

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I recommend reading Tom Sloper's site. He lays out the difference in his 60 articles and gives tons of advice. A programmer creates the games that a designer lays out. Tom has a few articles on his site about his typical day (he is a freelance game designer).

As for a career, it's very very very very very hard to "get" a game designer job. Almost everyone in that position has worked there way up from programming, art, QA, production, etc.

Good luck!

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I would say it's a misleading analogy, as it seems to be one cause of the overinflated ego that some designers get, where they think programmers are unimportant and merely exist to implement their whims.

Architecture has strong parallels with game design as it emphasises solid design and planning as opposed to just being The Idea Man. However, computer programming is a lot more advanced and technical than construction work, and has its own architectural-style issues. If anything, the programmer is an interior architect.

Anybody got a better analogy? :)

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Quote:
Original post by Kylotan
I would say it's a misleading analogy, as it seems to be one cause of the overinflated ego that some designers get, where they think programmers are unimportant and merely exist to implement their whims.

Architecture has strong parallels with game design as it emphasises solid design and planning as opposed to just being The Idea Man. However, computer programming is a lot more advanced and technical than construction work, and has its own architectural-style issues. If anything, the programmer is an interior architect.

Anybody got a better analogy? :)

I would disagree because the architect still needs approval from the civil, mechanical, or structural engineer before work can be done with the design. Also the construction workers themselves need to be able to read the blueprints that are derived from the design and sometimes make judgments when unforeseen problems arise.

The overinflated ego is not a fault of the analogy but a fault of the designer not understanding his role and the role of his colleagues.

But I'm open to newer and better analogies [smile]

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Quote:
Original post by Kylotan
However, computer programming is a lot more advanced and technical than construction work..

uh.. I don't think top qualified construction engineers would agree with that. It depends alot on what type of construcion work there is, on a big work the A-map is not simply a guided tour for buliding piece by piece. Alot of advanced technical issues must be solved along the way. ..Just clearing that up. [smile]

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95% of construction work is massively more trivial than computer programming, and 95% of construction workers will not be doing anything exceptionally complex, unlike programmers. Indeed, a 'civil, mechanical, or structural engineer' is quite unique among construction workers. Therefore the simple "construction=programming" analogy is flawed.

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