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How "professional" is SDL?

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Sorry if this is in the wrong forum, but I couldn't think of anywhere else to put it: Are there any professional game developers that use SDL? Could you get a job based on SDL knowledge alone? Being a small open-source project, it doesn't seem like you could, but it is a fairly comprehensive API. Just wondering.

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SDL has been used professionally, but DirectX pretty much has a stranglehold on the PC gaming industry.

Money making SDL projects tend to be from independent studios, where the small but game starved *nix userbase can can be the difference between success and failure.

Not the SDL isn't worth learning. It's an excellent stepping stone to DirectX and OpenGL. It's an excellent balance of OS abstraction without being too high level allowing you to learn the fundamentals.

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*shrug* define "professonal"?? :)

There are plenty of indie companies plying their wares through SDL and having great success with it.

Gish! is one project that springs to mind, but there are plenty of others that are based on SDL of various genres across the board.

The real power is being PC and Mac friendly though which can bring in bacon.

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Quote:
Original post by SippyCup
I read that Quake 4 used SDL.


Correct. It used SDL for the Linux Port.

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Search SDL on wikipedia and it will tell you many games that used SDL. Civilizations 2 and Quake 4 are a few.

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Quote:
Original post by programwizard
Could you get a job based on SDL knowledge alone?

No more than you could get a job based only on knowing how to make a WinMain function.

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Many places find it easy to port commerical Windows games over to Linux using SDL. Loki Software did just that with a bunch of games.

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In terms of development lifecycle, SDL reduces the amount of time required to get a base/skeleton application up and running. It also wraps other useful functionalities (threading, window-manager message-pump, input, etc). The good thing about these, is they allow you to focus on developing the game, without worrying about OS-centric APIs.

This might be considered a Bad Thing(tm) by some, but considering the time savings, I'd say the attitude of "unprofessional" library usage is pure, unadulterated FUD.

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SDL is as professional as you make it. If by "professional" you mean huge, overkill 500 meg API that does everything you could ever think of, you're out of luck. SDL is pretty minimal, but that's not to say it isn't effective. It does the job, it's cross-platform and it's small enough for a single person to understand it.

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I don't see why you couldn't make AAA titles using SDL. I'm using SDL for all the window management and input for my game and leaving graphics/audio to OpenGL and OpenAL. I think it's a great idea to learn SDL so you can make any of your code easily cross-platform (assuming you keep things like byte-endianness and a few minor things in mind). SDL doesn't seem to be slow or made simply for skeleton programs (like GLUT seems to be). Either way, do whatever you feel will benefit you in the end.

I personally believe a portfolio of working games (using whatever API) will be a nice thing to show prospective employers not because of your technical API knowledge, but just that you are capable of learning and using an API to create a finished product.

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there was a professional group of developers: Loki: http://www.lokigames.com/
They didn't developed their own games, but they ported a lot of windows games to Linux

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Quote:
Original post by programwizard
Could you get a job based on SDL knowledge alone?

You don't get a job by having an SDL knowledge alone; employers expect variety of skills, if SDL can help you demonstrate those skills, by all means use it. Trying to get a job based on SDL knowledge alone, like Sneftel said, is like saying that you can only write a WinMain function.

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Could you get the job knowing SDL alone? No.

Would knowing SDL in addition to your other skills better your odds at getting the job? Yes.

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I know this isn't 100% relative to your question. But it deals with SDL. LoL. =P

I am actually currently writing a simple engine, for myself, using SDL for input, graphics, and everything else. Once I'm done with the 2D, I'm planning on adding a 3D "division" to the engine. Sorry, couldn't think of what to call it. =P

And I like SDL. It's not complicated at all. I do all my own programming, and it didn't take much time at all for me to learn all I need to know to write an engine using SDL. =)

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