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slash90

Recomendable SDL tutorials

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I've been browsing through the forums looking for various beginner information. such as what programming language to use, and how do i get started.. after reading C for dummies i feel that i have the bare basics of C down but still need more experience. so ive ordered the all-in-one desk reference of c for dummies. (im a big fan of the for dummies series because it takes the gentle, slower approach into a subject. you get the basics and can then go from there) ive found (i think) that SDL is very good to start off with in terms of game programming as it just uses 2d... So my question is...where can i find some good beginner SDL tutorials

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Quote:
Original post by slash90
So my question is...where can i find some good beginner SDL tutorials
Just posted some links here that might be of interest.

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*points to sig*

Post if setting up SDL on VS.NET 2005 is significantly different from 2003.

I already have like 20 different C++ compilers/IDEs on my computer. Don't feel like installing another one.

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Quote:
Original post by Lazy Foo
*points to sig*

Post if setting up SDL on VS.NET 2005 is significantly different from 2003.

I already have like 20 different C++ compilers/IDEs on my computer. Don't feel like installing another one.


It worked perfectly with the express edition for me.

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Head to gpwiki.org > tutorials > SDL

It'll have tutorials there and all the current links like Sol, Foo, jnrdev, Cone3D

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Quote:
Original post by Sr_Guapo
Quote:
Original post by Lazy Foo
*points to sig*

Post if setting up SDL on VS.NET 2005 is significantly different from 2003.

I already have like 20 different C++ compilers/IDEs on my computer. Don't feel like installing another one.


It worked perfectly with the express edition for me.


Well that's not the thing, are the menus any different to the point where another tutorial has to be made?

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thanks alot guys

ive been looking at lazy foo's tutorials and they help alot!

the book i read didnt explain everything(dummies book). so i do have a few basic c questions though

void apply_surface( int x, int y, SDL_Surface* source, SDL_Surface* destination )

what exactly do the arguments for a function do?

and, what does the * do?

if someone can explain these i think i could get through them alot better

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Quote:

ive been looking at lazy foo's tutorials and they help alot!

the book i read didnt explain everything(dummies book). so i do have a few basic c questions though

void apply_surface( int x, int y, SDL_Surface* source, SDL_Surface* destination )

what exactly do the arguments for a function do?

I guess the book should explain what function arguments are, so search the index. Function arguments are "values" passed to a function, so that the function can work with some info from "outside" it. The name of the arguments can be used as variables within the function body.

Quote:

and, what does the * do?

It indicates that we have a pointer (lots of people claim pointers is one of the hardest things in C, but I think it's not soooo hard). It's a "special" variable that holds the address of another variable, so (in your example function), source is a pointer to a variable of type SDL_Surface. Pointers are commonly used as "aliases" for variables, so, in the function you posted, values of x and y variables can be used but any change you may make to them won't be reflected outside the function. But it's not the case with source and destination, any change you make to these ones will be reflected in the argumentes passed when calling the function.

Pointers are a powerful feature of C (and C++, and some other programming languages), recheck your book, they should be included there no matter how "simple" the book is supposed to be.

Best wishes,
José J. Enríquez (GeoMX).

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take a peak at http://www.aaroncox.net/tutorials/ . It doesnt cover as much info as lazy foo's site but it taught me how to put a game together so I always recomend it.

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