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shwangler

External HDDs (SATA)

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I'm trying to buy a hard drive for more space since my laptop has only 30GB and found a good deal on this internal SATA... (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16822148064). I'm now looking at enclosures for the bad mo fo and am wondering about compatibility... I found this enclosure which will apparently handle a Sata drive and have a USB connection to my computer (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817185006). Will they fit well together? Is there something I'm missing that I should know before I buy? Does this combination even make sense? Thanks a ton for any help. Sam

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Nothing unusual about that. Might want to think about how you're going to supply power to the drive. Also you might have a compatibility issue if you're running Linux, but if you're running Windows XP it should just pick it up.

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Thanks, good deal... It says it comes with a Universal External AC power adapter (100-240V)"... won't that supply the power?
Sam

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While the devices might fit together, I wouldn't match those two.

You're buying a very fast hard drive (1.5Gbps). You'll be putting it on a USB-2 connection (480Mbps max only obtained if you are the only device on the chain and you have sufficient CPU resources since USB needs additional processing).

You will be limited by the USB cable between the housing and your computer.

As an analogy, you are buying a fast sports car and then installing a speed governer that lets you go at a snails pace.


You'll want to have an Ultra3 SCSI or an eSATA adapter if you want to take advantage of the hard drive speed. Otherwise, just by any old ATA-66 hard drive that you can find for cheap.

[edit] Additionally, just because the device claims USB 2.0 compliance doesn't mean it operates at the highest USB signalling speeds. It could be as low as 1.5Mbps and still be fully USB 2.0 compliant. It is more likely that it is running at full USB speed (12Mbps) rather than the highest "USB Hi-Speed" rating. Having a drive at 1500 Mbps with an adapter that could easily max out at 1.5Mbps doesn't seem like a great idea to me.

[Edited by - frob on April 6, 2006 2:28:38 PM]

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To add to Frob's comments: beware external drive enclosures. I had twelve external drive enclosures, a combination of purchased retail drives and "do it yourself" kits with internal drives. Not long after I got bit by the "Delayed Write Failure" problem - see http://www.bustrace.com/delayedwrite/index.htm for more information. The problem occurs with BOTH USB and Firewire drives!

Search the web and you'll find no one willing to shoulder the responsibility of the misconfigured chipsets - Microsoft blames the hardware (although it is the driver at fault) while the hardware manufacturers blame Microsoft.

This problem doesn't occur with all external drives but I've had more than my fair share of it occur to me - and the housings you're looking at might very well have the Oxford 911 chipset that is mostly to blame. Be wary.

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