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C++ Reference books

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Stroustrup's book is a great REFERENCE, but its kind of boring to read, so don't expect to learn C++ from it (I did, and it was a pain in the a...)

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Original post by xEricx
Stroustrup's book is a great REFERENCE, but its kind of boring to read, so don't expect to learn C++ from it (I did, and it was a pain in the a...)
I concur. Once you know C++, it's indispensible, however.

Stroustrup and Josuttis will cover 90% of what you will need.

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I've been reading a newer book called "Professional C++" that came out in 2005 (i think). I got it from the library and so far it's been pretty good. It's extra-verbose, but it covers everything.

Stroustrup's book is the de facto standard C++ reference though. It's not good for newbies, but makes a good reference book.

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Original post by xEricx
Stroustrup's book is a great REFERENCE, but its kind of boring to read, so don't expect to learn C++ from it (I did, and it was a pain in the a...)


Really? I thought it was quite a good read. I had read bits of other C++ books before, and they always left large parts out, and didn't even bother discussing some issues. Stroustrup's book is the only book I recommend for learning C++ if you've had other programming experience. I can see how a newbie would be quickly put to sleep in a haze of confusion from Stroustrup's book, but if you already know other programming languages, learning C++ from Stroustrup's book should be a snap. Would you rather learn to build compilers from "Compilers for dummies in 24 hours" or the dragon book? There's no better source from which to learn than the best source on the subject. If you can't learn from that, perhaps you should try something a little easier.

As for Josuttis' book, it's irreplacable. Especially since Stroustrup's book barely touches on the the STL at all.

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For the newbies then I would recommend:

SAMS Teach Yourself C++ - In 21 Days

You won't learn it all in 21 days of course (my advice... just go at your own pace), but it's a pretty easy book for a novice to get into.

Just follow the lessons... Experiment with and re-modify those lessons (this is the MOST important part... Programming is a 'doing' as well as a thinking activity), then move onto the next.

With some determination, effort and time, you should have a good working knowledge on C++ (no more than intermediary however) once you've completed the book.

I have a pretty old version (4th Edition), but I've seen some newer, ANSI up to date versions out there.

So check it out.

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Since we're talking references (and not beginner books), I'll suggest Standard C++ IOStreams and Locales by Langer & Kreft.

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