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ben06

c++?

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Depends on how much money you're willing to invest, though there some good free C++ compilers and IDEs, such as VC++ 2005 or Codeblocks (with GCC).

Or did you mean something else by "C++ program" ?

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VS 2005 Express would be the best pick for a free C++ compiler. Beware though, to start making your 3d game you will also need a bunch of libraries.

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Original post by ben06
Sorry I mean C++ compilers


The best one is the one you like best. Some options are:

Dev-C++ (free)
MS Visual Studio (free for Express Edition, a couple grand for Pro edition)
Notepad + command line compiler (free many options)

Best thing to do is download Dev-C++ and the MSVS Express Edition and play around with them. Figure out which you like better.


Quote:

Beware though, to start making your 3d game you will also need a bunch of libraries.


Well, this is true no matter what compiler/IDE he uses. It's kind of irrelivant to the question.

-me

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the IDE isnt a big deal but if you want to learn to program in 3D i recomend using the opengl glut

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Original post by Palidine
Quote:

Beware though, to start making your 3d game you will also need a bunch of libraries.


Well, this is true no matter what compiler/IDE he uses. It's kind of irrelivant to the question.

-me


Depends on how you interpret his question.
What I meant is you need more than a 'C++ program' to make a game.
Actually I think the decision on what libraries are you going to use is much more important than deciding the compiler.

[Edited by - Calin on April 15, 2006 1:44:25 PM]

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Quote:
Original post by Calin
Quote:
Original post by Palidine
Quote:

Beware though, to start making your 3d game you will also need a bunch of libraries.


Well, this is true no matter what compiler/IDE he uses. It's kind of irrelivant to the question.

-me


Depends on how you interpret his question.
What I meant is you need more than a 'C++ program' to make a game.
Actually I think the decision on what libraries are you going to use is much more important than deciding the compiler.


Actually you can make a game with just C++. Text based but it's still a game.

Also, if you dont feel comfortable and know your way around your IDE well (recommend an IDE over notepad hehe but that does work) you'll be slower to develop and may become discouraged and drop the project. Also debugger(s) should be considered too. Microsoft Visual Studio Express comes with a nice one, I'm not sure about the others as I've not used them.

Best of luck.

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Quote:
Original post by Palidine

Quote:

Beware though, to start making your 3d game you will also need a bunch of libraries.


Well, this is true no matter what compiler/IDE he uses. It's kind of irrelivant to the question.

-me


Not really irrelevent. If you download the VS2005 express edition then you will also need to download the Platform SDK to program for Win32 as opposed to .NET. If you choose not to download the platform SDK then you can still make games if you like by using Managed DirectX.

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For simple stuff and learning, nothing beats the simple yet powerful DevC++. It's fast, it's neutral (meaning it supports Standard C++). Microsoft does support Standard C++ but it still adds a lot of its own shit.

But for something large VC++ 2005 is essential.

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Original post by Huffer
For simple stuff and learning, nothing beats the simple yet powerful DevC++. It's fast, it's neutral (meaning it supports Standard C++). Microsoft does support Standard C++ but it still adds a lot of its own shit.

But for something large VC++ 2005 is essential.


Gcc also adds "a lot of its own shit". But the additions are rarely used outside of the gnu community, as fas as I can tell.

[Edited by - rip-off on April 16, 2006 8:02:29 AM]

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Original post by Huffer
For simple stuff and learning, nothing beats the simple yet powerful DevC++. It's fast, it's neutral (meaning it supports Standard C++). Microsoft does support Standard C++ but it still adds a lot of its own shit.

But if VC++ also supports standard C++, what's the problem with that point? That, as you called it, "lots of its own shit" is nothing a beginner learning C++ need to know about anyway, so that's just a stupid argument.

VC++, the Express edition, is also free, and I don't see on what points it would be slow. So all the points that made DevC++ the obvious choise for you is, to me, equally valid for VC++.

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VC++ for me is simply too big to use everytime I want to compile and launch 5-10 lines of test code, or book examples. DevC++ is much more convinient for this.

Of course, if you're writing something serious, VC++ is definitely the way to go.

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New here and just getting my feet wet with C++. I have done some C/C++ on Visual Studio 6.0, but support seems to be switching to the newer compilers.

My real question is, if I'm wanting to work with DirectX, even earlier editions, and use a compiler that is as close to Standard C++ as possible,_and_ one of the most common compilers used by some good articles/tutorials _and_ has a good IDE?

I realize that there is no _absolute_ way to go in this area....

I guess my main concern is staying as close to Standard C++ and being able to follow along in good books/references, without having to figure out, "WHY this won't work on my compiler !?!!" or struggling for days to get it _to_ work. I know myself well enough that this would lead to my demise.

I recently purchased "Accelerated C++..." by Koenig and Moo. It's old I know, but several sites have recommended it. I also puchased Isometric Game Programming with DirectX 7 by Pazera. It too is an older book.

I'm not much interested in DevC++ ... too much to wade through <imho> Although, some would say the same of MS.

I'd prefer something with an IDE, maybe MS. But which one?
VS 2005 or .Net compiler? And what are the differences?

Thanks in advance and sorry this post was so long.

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Just starting out myself, this was my impression of both bloodshed and msvc...

I tried bloodshed first, simply because it was a smaller download. The first thing I noticed was that not only had I gotten a C++ ide, but also a C# and VB.net ide/compiler/converter. Cool, 3 for the price of one (which was free to begin with!). I played around with it a little, being a huge fan of f1 and help in general I quickly found that it well lacking in the department. Most tutorials I ran through it seemed to compile with little complaints though. Wasn't bad at all, but it did have a unpolished feel to it.

After playing around with bloodshed, I downloaded msvc express edition (340ish megs, + another 300 megs for psdk, + 120 megs msdn library + 150 megs sql express). After almost a gig of downloading I was ready! There is no doubt that the MSVC++ is cleaner, more polished has a ton of features for those just starting, msdn library and intellisense just for starters. I did run into a few snags, at first nothing would compile period. Some kind of debugging error, after googling that issue I got it resolved by changing the project settings the first few times (it's funny because after 5 or 6 projects the error just went away) also I found that it supports a kind of global header file, stdafx.h which has been kind of flakey at times as well. Basically it acts a storage bin for all of your #include directives. Then you can just type #include "stdafx.h" in your source and whatever headers you've listed will be included.

Basically Bloodshed make it extremely easy (and fast) to get up and going, and didn't complain at all. MSVC was a little more fickle but once it was going has provided a much richer ide. To do over again I'd probably go with MS once again, the msdn library is an invaluable service at my fingertips, and you know you're getting a fully supported ide.

C++ express edition is a .net product, however I've yet to create a project using the .net framework, so in essence I suspect you're getting the best of both worlds. At some point if I want managed/CLI C++ it's there, but while just learning I don't have to deal with it. Not to mention express is free (if you get it before November) whereas if I wanted Visual Studio I'd have to shell out a few hundred bucks for even the standard edition.

Here is a side by side comparison between Visual Studio(s) and Express:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/products/compare/default.aspx

[Edited by - senelebe on April 16, 2006 12:36:08 PM]

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Thanks Senelebe.

I think that I will check out VS 2005 Express.

I was reading some of the articles at msdn on Coding4fun.

Thanks for the help.

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