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monster truck physics

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Does anyone know where i can download a base of monster truck physics that acutally feel like the real thing as in 10,000 pounds 1500 hp monster jam type deal and not some play toy?

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The important difference between a play toy monster truck and a real monster truck is scale. In the film industry, miniature models were filmed in slow motion to give the appearance of full-sized, real-world objects. If you were to find a toy truck sim, all you would have to do is crank down gravity (and perhaps cut down the effective engine power (though blown V8 4WD trucks are pretty quick)). This would effectively slow down the simulation. Likewise, to make a big truck behave more like a toy, increase gravity (and perhaps increase effective engine power).

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what ive been looking for to no succces is a full sized monster truck physics package that have the simulated handling as they do in real life, most i could find was the toy ones. I would have tryed to maginfy the toy ones to act like a real life monster but im not good with physics.

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The difference between monster truck and regular car simulation would be the weight of the wheels.

These can be neglected in a typical car (1000kg chassis, 20kg each wheel). In a monster truck, the ratio would most likely be (700kg chassis, 300kg transmission and axis, 200kg each wheel). Numbers could be way off, but still.

A typical rigid body approximation of a car is just that - a rigid box. In a monster truck, you need to simulate two wheel pairs and axis connection to the chassis.

The physics can be quite well approximated by treating each wheel pair separately or using the standard rigid body modeling (many engines can achieve that). Then connect the chassis on top of these with springs. This should give you rather flexible approximation.

Note that I didn't test this, but this is how I would approach the problem in an easy way. I imagine that calculating the actual full-body model would be rather complex (not sure if it would bring enough any benefit at all).

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Quote:
Original post by emyers
im lost lol, im a noob to physics and im not sure what axis your talking about and rigid body. :(


Hmm, what kind of model were you looking for then? I assumed it was about how to model monster trucks with conventional aproaches or existing physics packages.

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Quote:
Original post by emyers
what ive been looking for to no succces is a full sized monster truck physics package that have the simulated handling as they do in real life, most i could find was the toy ones. I would have tryed to maginfy the toy ones to act like a real life monster but im not good with physics.


It sounds like you found a "toy monster truck" package: turning down gravity (and then adjusting spring/damper rates, engine power) would get you pretty close pretty fast to a full-size monster truck. Antheus's ideas would also help, as would making sure that the wheels wobble and jiggle and the entire "cab/frame/bed" tilt/wobble and go nuts (relative to the wheels), just like "real" monster trucks.

You could also purchase a highly detailed toy monster R/C truck, film it up close, then bring into the computer and it slow down (Premiere/PC, Final Cut Pro/Mac).

[only half kidding here, as this could easily be done, some people might even pay to try it] If you want it to be interactive, and don't want to deal with all the messy computational physics, you could set up a webcam and an R/C monster truck, and have your customers send joystick/keyboard input to the R/C truck via internet, while you send back wireless in-truckvideo and audio* of the actual truck driving around (a sort of tele-internet telepresence "experience" for your customers, all with zero physics coding). Many frames of video would need to be queued (blame the resulting lag on the internet), so that the 2D image/video processor can "slow it down" before sending the video back. To simplify coding (and perhaps to increase marketshare), just send keyboard+mouse data and set up the GUI to represent a "Fantasy RTS Monster* Truck Bash" (single clicks to tell truck what to do. In this case, you could hire someone (or find a student to do it for the "fame/work-experience") to listen to an internet log text-to-speech system telling them where to drive the truck and what to do).

*Marketing tie-in: LOTR/Warcraft characters as truck bodies. For "spells" you could have students dressed as monsters (including, perhaps Godzilla for variety) run in and kick/pickup up "enemy" monster trucks. A water/fire hose would also be useful.

*This 1-Watt system is pretty cool (could have your volunteer drive the car using the VR glasses and hood[wink]).
Check out the videos on this page

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well i found a game that im happy with the physics, how do i find the physics that they used in the game? Is it located in the exe or what not?

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Quote:
Original post by emyers
well i found a game that im happy with the physics, how do i find the physics that they used in the game? Is it located in the exe or what not?


Yes, the physics are encoded in the exe, but you would need the source code (used to create the exe) to (realistically) learn how the physics are coded. What language do you use to develop software?

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Quote:
Original post by emyers
C- i belive


Now that you've found a game/demo that looks good, have your programmer(s) study the game/demo and use something like PhysX/ODE to implement the monster truck physics. Have them start with one of the vehicle demos included in the physics package, then tweak until they get the desired behavior (reduce gravity, adjust springs+dampers, etc.). Your programmers should be reasonably skilled in C/C++, and have a good math background (able to work with linear algebra (vectors, matrices), basic differential equations, simple Newtonian physics, etc.).

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Original post by emyers
i wish i did have a programming background but im only 15 and im learning this stuff so i can try to get a scholarship to college.


Sign up for a free copy of Visual Studio 2005: info here. Start with C#: if there is a C# interface to PhysX (etc.), keep using C#, otherwise gradually start learning C++ in order to interface with the PhysX SDK (or physics engine of your choice). The free offer for VS2005 ends on Monday (Monday is the last day).

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