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microsoft vs. bloodshed

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The integrated debugger is really something you'd want to try. The ditor itself is also very good (better than dev-cpp's editor IMHO). The integrated help system rocks and there's a ton of functionalities.

Beside that, their goals are the same :)

Regards,

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I'm a huge fan of VS.NET. Its easier to navigate, has better macros, better debug options, etc.

I ran into a few bugs the few times I've tried dev-cpp. For example, the watch window will not update until the mouse clicks on it. Thats not really a bug, but I have seen a variable get updated incorrectly. I was watching 2 variables, lets call them:
object->position.x
and
velocity.x
I was stepping through a function that had a pointer to object and a local velocity (the variables above). And for some reason, it thought that one of the (x) variables was the other and incorrectly updated it.

I haven't used other compilers much, but when I did, I just couldn't see any reason to use them over Visual Studio. If you haven't tried it, I highly suggest you do; though it is a bit pricy if you don't get a nice student discount.

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If you;re doing any DirectX(specifically Direct3D) MSVS is the way to go, on 2003(don't know about 2005) it has special debuggers for Direct3D. And the compiler is alot more specific when doing Windows programming.

It comes with a bunch of tools too.
The integrated help system is a great feature, I come to find myself using it all the time.

I've never liked Dev-C++, I don't know why. Another free one that I use from time to time is Code::Blocks.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by shred master
i dont like the way that you have to include microsoft specific stuff which isnt standard c++


You don't have to.

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Quote:
Original post by shred master
i saw some guy and he was putting in pre-processor directives that wernt standard.


It's possible to write non-standard code, but I don't believe VC++ have any non-standard pre-processor directives. What were the directives? Anyway the debugger is the most important thing in Visual Studio. Also IntelliSense seems to be better than the Dev-Cpp equivilant.

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#pragma once is typically found at the start of header files to stop the compiler from loading the header file again. This is only found on MS compilers to my knowledge.

But I guess that if you have written a whole project using the #pragma once directive then you could write a simple program to convert all the #pragma once directives into the standard include guards.

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I wouldnt know how to use most of those features and i have never had a problem with dev c++ the only reason i dont use vc++ is cause it wont install on my computer. SO in tht respect it sux for me.

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The reasons I prefer Visual Studios:

-Editor is better than Dev-CPPs. I hated Dev's annoying auto tabbing, VC's is good.
-Debugger is easier to use and more straight-forward. Never really figured out that debugger in Dev, it liked to not stop at my break points.
-Example code has a VC project 99% of the time. Its always nice when you find that you don't have to put all the code into a new project just to compile a small example.
-Loads a bit faster than Dev does.
-Compiles faster, though it does sometimes not compile everything that needs to be compiled.

The first three are my main ones, though. The last two are fairly minor differences.

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I personally like Visual Studio. The one major downfall is the price, as another poster has already mentioned, but if you go to http://www.learn2asp.net/ you can watch three webcasts and get Visual Studio 2005 Standard free. There is a thread in the Lounge about it.

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I think VC++ is too "complex" for simple stuff, like code from books, simple little programs etc. DevC++ is much better for that. Launch, click "New", type the code and compile. In VC++ you have to wait till it loads, spend 2 minutes creating a project etc. etc.

But for something complex VC++ is essential.

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if your absolutly sure there is no specific stuff for vsc++ ,can u tell me all of the stuff u need to download to get the best out of it. and also, what happens after uve had it free for a year?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Visual Studio is handsdown the best environment if you're developing on Windows.
With the Express editions being free (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/), there really is no reason not to use it. (Contrary to what most people seem to think, the Express and Pro versions do not differ THAT much).

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Quote:
Original post by shred master
if your absolutly sure there is no specific stuff for vsc++ ,can u tell me all of the stuff u need to download to get the best out of it. and also, what happens after uve had it free for a year?

You can write code that can compile using different compilers on different platforms using visual studio. A perfect example of this would be the humus framework.

What do you need to get visual studio up and running? Well the express version is free as long as you download it before november of this year. If you download before november it will be free for you forever, but come november microsoft will start charging for vs express (but this wont apply to you as you will already have it) [smile]

Get VC++ Express and the Platform SDK and you should be good to go.

All the best,
ViLiO

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Say what you want about Microsoft, but when you get right down to it they ARE a software development company with lots and lots of money to pour into software development and, consequently, the tools that they use. A natural consequnce of this is that they have some of the best development tools in the bussiness, bar none! If you haven't, go get VC++ 2005 Express and play around with it for a bit. You'll be sold within a week.

The only REAL downside here is that they're windows-only, and I seriously doubt that's going to change any time soon...

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Guest Anonymous Poster
So don't use "Microsoft's c++". VS is perfectly capable of compiling standards compliant code.

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The C++ standard is called "ANSI C++". There really isn't a whole lot of stuff specific to VC++, other than the affeormentioned #pragma directive (not that I've seen, anyway). Get a book or read a tutorial that teaches you ANSI C++, and then you won't have to worry about using Microsoft specific code. Also, even if you don't think you'll ever use VC++ Express, you may as well download it now anyway, because this November it stops being free and will start costing $50. You never know when you might need it.

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Quote:
Original post by shred master
free forever? i thought it was a year. but dudes, the only reason i keep goin on about ms specific and everything is cos i wanna learn c++, not microsofts visual c++


Visual C++ is the name of the IDE, that's all. The compiler that comes with the latest versions of VC++ is among the most standards conforming in existence. Like most compilers, there are some nonstandard extensions that you can use (ie. pragma once).

Perhaps you're thinking of managed C++ (C++.NET)? That's something else entirely, and it's reasonably safe to say you'll never need to worry about it.

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Quote:
Original post by wild_pointer
Quote:
Original post by shred master
free forever? i thought it was a year. but dudes, the only reason i keep goin on about ms specific and everything is cos i wanna learn c++, not microsofts visual c++


Visual C++ is the name of the IDE, that's all. The compiler that comes with the latest versions of VC++ is among the most standards conforming in existence. Like most compilers, there are some nonstandard extensions that you can use (ie. pragma once).

Perhaps you're thinking of managed C++ (C++.NET)? That's something else entirely, and it's reasonably safe to say you'll never need to worry about it.


#pragma's are compiler dependant, they are not non-standard. In fact, in a sence, they are standard (as standard as having int main(int ac, char*av[], char*env[], int i_am_still_standard)).

Moreover, C++/CLI (managed C++) IS standard (see here). And you can expect it to be implemented on other platforms as well.

Regards,

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