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What is .NET??

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OK, I've seen .NET mentioned everywhere, but have never found a proper definition, or at least one that makes sense. To me, it seems that it is a Microsoft thing that allows compatibility over the internet, or something like that. If this is so, why does everyone recommend using .NET, and you need a .NET framework to use certain applications... It's very confusing, can anyone explain it to me, or direct me to a source that can?

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Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
What Is .NET?


While this is correct, it doesn't really say much in the context of games or rich client applications in general.

When applied to desktop applications ("I wrote a paint utility in .NET"), .NET is mostly used as a shorthand of the combination of the .NET framework and of the Common Language Infrastructure, or CLI.

The CLI is, in a nutshell, an infrastructure you can integrate a programming language with so it can communicate with any other piece of software written for the CLI. That is, VB.NET and C# are two CLI languages and that's why you can transparently use VB.NET objects in C#. All .NET languages are compiled to an abstract ".NET assembly language" which is in turn, compiled just in time (JIT) as the application is launched for the first time.

The .NET framework is a set of objects to be used mainly by CLI languages, altough mechanisms like COM allows you to chuse them. It's pretty much like the C++ standard library or the Java standard library, except it works with all .NET languages. <opinion>It is also much more complete and rich.</opinion>

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ok, thanks. It was a little confusing, as I associate .NET with the internet, having non internet related software using .NET and its framework seemed confusing. Now I have been enlightened! Thanks!

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In a nutshell, .NET is Microsoft's attempt at creating a platform independant structure like Java.

1.Java runs on many plaforms, and so will .NET (eventually).

2.Java only supports one language which is obviously Java. .NET supports many languages (C#, VB.NET, J#, etc.)

3.Java focuses on general applcations and applets, .NET focuses on the "RAD" concept of programming (RAD - Rapid Application Development).

If I can be of any more help, just give a holla [wink].

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Not to nitpick, but...

Quote:
Original post by vrok137
1.Java runs on many plaforms, and so will .NET (eventually).

2.Java only supports one language which is obviously Java. .NET supports many languages (C#, VB.NET, J#, etc.)


1. .NET does run on MacOS, Linux, Solaris, etc. through Mono, which is another implementation of the CLI standard. The non-standard stuff in .NET doesn't all work, though.

2. While Sun only supports one language, there are compilers for almost 200 languages that target the JVM. Most of them aren't viable for commercial use, I'm sure, but still...

Google cache of a page listing them here, just for fun.



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Quote:
Original post by smitty1276
Not to nitpick, but...

Quote:
Original post by vrok137
1.Java runs on many plaforms, and so will .NET (eventually).

2.Java only supports one language which is obviously Java. .NET supports many languages (C#, VB.NET, J#, etc.)


1. .NET does run on MacOS, Linux, Solaris, etc. through Mono, which is another implementation of the CLI standard. The non-standard stuff in .NET doesn't all work, though.

2. While Sun only supports one language, there are compilers for almost 200 languages that target the JVM. Most of them aren't viable for commercial use, I'm sure, but still...

Google cache of a page listing them here, just for fun.


Hehe, what I meant to say was that JVM supports Sun's Java, I did not care to mention the 200+ home-brewed mockups...

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