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e_rivera

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Hi, I'm new here. I'm interested in being a game programmer, next year I'll be going to college and I was just wondering, what degree do game companies require? Should I go for a degree in Computer Engineering (Software Engineering)? Or would a degree in Computer Science be better? I mainly want to write code for games, which one is more programming oriented? I heard that you need strong math skills to be a programmer, I really haven't taken too many 'advanced' math courses, just Algebra 1/2, Geometry, and Trig. Should I be worried? Oh, and, Is there anything else I should know about this place? Thank you. ~ e_rivera

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It depends on where you go and how good you are. Not only education, but experience, a portfolio, and most importantly, social skills, are big things companies are looking for along with many other qualities. Software Engineering and Computer Science degrees are generally a focus on software development I would say. You will need to take a lot of higher math courses for any engineering degree. You're looking at advanced calculus, at least, for just a 4-year. That also depends on which college you attend and their programs, but you will be taking plenty of calculus.

Some game developers didn't even study computer-related fields in college at all and stemed from personal hobbies and such. You can't just take a computer science course and say, "I'm ready for game design." Firstly, it's a whole different ballpark than just regular software engineering with business and productivity applications. You may want to see if you can search around the net, or here even, for articles on professionals or people who have gotten jobs in the industry, or even people looking to hire young game developers. Check out some game companies' sites for job postings. That way you can see what is required of people and what education/traininer/experience you might want to seek. College is the begining, not the end of a career.

My initial adventure into computer science led me through an entire year of courses doing mainly C++ programming and math, and other courses since it was just GEs at the time. I went to work at a family friend's software company doing little basic things, as I had worked with C++ for a while beforehand, and I wanted to get a taste of the real world. What happened was I found out how horrible I thought it was to stare at a screen for 8+ hours a day thinking of logic and design. It just wasn't my thing. That doesn't mean it isn't yours, but just don't get disapointed if you change your mind about things. You are young and you may find new interests. I'm going into my 3rd year of college now and I've switched over to my original passion of IT solutions, consulting, development, and deployment with a good friend of mine. Just a contracting business. I program as a hobby now.

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Quote:
Original post by e_rivera
Oh, and, Is there anything else I should know about this place?

the search button [grin]
go to the Lounge, once a week.
ask all questions in the For Beginners forum until you make an application or game to show everyone (ok, well it's good in theory)
remember that the question you're gonna ask, has been asked and answered about 10 times already so use the search button.... oh i said already didn't i? [grin]

also have fun! [smile]

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In addition to what has been say about "this place". When you ask for critiques, make sure you want to know the answer and now just get a feel good answer because you will get an answer and sometimes they are not very fuzzy answers. Simply, don't worry about asking for help but think your questions through and be prepared for the truth.

Welcome!

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Can't help you much with this one, but I can tell you that computer-science is more hardware (motherboards, cpu) and stuff like that, some computer science courses/educations doesn't even have programming at all.

I've heard from some people that are gameprogrammers that math skills is much more valuable and much better to improve than your programming skills.

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Welcome!

I think that game programming requires experience. If you go to features on the top of the page here and click game jobs, and check out any of the programming jobs, they'll say something like: "5+ years of C/C++ and object oriented design experience required."
You should take a look at some of the jobs listed on this site to get an idea of what they're looking for. Here's an exqample: Graphics Programmer (Rendering) for LucAsarts

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