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ablaye

Game Developement in Windows Vs. Apple Mac

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Promit    13246
Not particularly, although certain libraries (like DirectX) might not be available on both platforms. But if you're developing for both simultaneously, be careful of processor issues, like endianness.

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jpetrie    13159
(Assuming by "design" you actually mean "design" and not "develop").

Yes, but mainly in terms of the user interface. For example, you should support the user interface guidelines of the respective OS (Alt-F, X generally quits a Windows program while Command-Q generally quits a Mac OS program, for example) and deal with the various hardware issues (for Macs, you probably shouldn't assume two-button mice, whereas that's pretty safe to do for Windows).

The same kind of considerations need to be given for localization even on a single-OS game.

Designing the gameplay itself is generally platform agnostic.

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superpig    1825
As far as game design goes, no. But from a technical standpoint, there are differences, both in the libraries available (as Promit noted), and in best practices type things - look at MacOS Application Bundles, for example.

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Ademan555    361
In code? Practice? Or what? Really the code is still the same stuff (at the game logic level) however, at the engine level... setting up your window will be different, you can only use OpenGL... OpenAL is probably your best bet for sound, SDL is your best bet for input as far as i can tell. SDL is really a pretty good bet all around (it covers Window creation (in a way that code can be reused for windows), input, basic graphics if you want, and sound if you want, plus things like SDL_net can help you with other aspects of game development), though i suppose glut might work for input and window creation, I would suggest SDL over it.

In practice, its still the same idea, you'll probably get an IDE, hack out some code, compile, test.

cheers
-Dan

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Horatius83    187
On older macs the bit order is reversed, with the newer Intel based macs this isn't a problem. Other than that you should be able to keep your game logic and OS code seperate. I think there are some issues with Mac hardware too, though the G5 uses PCI-Express, so I would assume you can upgrade your graphics card.

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Alpha_ProgDes    6936
Quote:
Original post by Cubed3
Just use SDL and OpenGL and your fine.

is it that simple? can you just whip up some code on your Mac and then compile; then take that exact same code and compile on your PC?

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jyk    2094
Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Cubed3
Just use SDL and OpenGL and your fine.

is it that simple? can you just whip up some code on your Mac and then compile; then take that exact same code and compile on your PC?
You're right, it's not quite that simple, but SDL really does smooth the way by hiding most of the details that are commonly platform-dependent. I'm developing my current project in OS X using SDL and OpenGL, and although I haven't gotten to the porting-to-Windows part yet, I'm optimistic that it will be fairly painless :-)

In any case, some tips (some of which have already been mentioned):

1. Be aware of endian-ness issues (SDL can help with this also)
2. Use platform-agnostic tools whenever possible (boost::filesystem, for example)

One possible gotcha is timing; SDL's timer may not be high-precision enough for some purposes. As for the switch to Intel, I'm not sure what exactly the implications will be.

Finally, another good reference for all things Mac is idevgames.com.

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superpig    1825
Quote:
Original post by jyk
Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Cubed3
Just use SDL and OpenGL and your fine.

is it that simple? can you just whip up some code on your Mac and then compile; then take that exact same code and compile on your PC?
You're right, it's not quite that simple, but SDL really does smooth the way by hiding most of the details that are commonly platform-dependent. I'm developing my current project in OS X using SDL and OpenGL, and although I haven't gotten to the porting-to-Windows part yet, I'm optimistic that it will be fairly painless :-)

In any case, some tips (some of which have already been mentioned):

1. Be aware of endian-ness issues (SDL can help with this also)
2. Use platform-agnostic tools whenever possible (boost::filesystem, for example)

One possible gotcha is timing; SDL's timer may not be high-precision enough for some purposes. As for the switch to Intel, I'm not sure what exactly the implications will be.

Finally, another good reference for all things Mac is idevgames.com.


Agreed on all counts. When I ported one of the old Enginuity games from PC to Mac, the only code I had to change was four lines that dealt with packing bytes into colour DWORDs (the order was different due to endianness). The rest of the code just worked.

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klette    138
SDL on mac is a bit.. well.. not as good as on linux/win32 (yet) .. However, if you stick to STL and such, most things will work out of the box.. Remember that gcc is a bit different on mac (-framework OpenGL instead of -lGL if im not mistaken and such.. )

Good luck anyways :)

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