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Gamemaker or C?

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I'm extremely new to game making. I know nothing of codes. But, I do have an outdated book called how to make games in c. I was in the process of piecing together a tutorial from use in gamemaker, however my version of gamemaker is unregistered and apparently won't let me write scripts. I've no desire to pay for a programme I may or may not use, so, I weighed my options and moved on. I have installed Dev C++. I hear that C++ is THE language of game making. And I also hear you can write C code in C++. I'm guessing I can begin learning to make code with this free programme. Is that wise? And whatis OpenGL? Should I invest my time with it? I hear it's THE thing for game making. And can anyone lend advise to a heathen?

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game maker is crap i personally hate it and as a newvbie programmer myself, c++ is hard and challenging but you can make much better games from it but it takes time. Open GL is an api used to create the graphics for the game and is the linux distro version to microsoft's directx. if you have time use c++ if not then use gamemaker but your games are going to look like crap as the graphics are not that good. I personally dont like it bvut i do have it and you need a knowledge of sprites to use gm

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Original post by kingsrookie
game maker is crap i personally hate it and as a newvbie programmer myself,


Yes you're true kingsrookie but it's nice to design game prototypes if you don't want to spend a lot of time and get an idea of what you want..
of course for a more reliable and sustainable project should C++ programming considered

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Original post by onan
And I also hear you can write C code in C++. I'm guessing I can begin learning to make code with this free programme. Is that wise?

C++ is more or less c with new features,
also yes, devc++ is somewhat simpler and less bloated than microsft compilers

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gamemaker vs c really depends on two thing
1 how quciky do you want to see results
2 how far do you want to go with this (learning to make games)

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Original post by JohnBSmall
Start Here.
Python.


Agreed. Learn programming first. Games are impossibly difficult to write if you don't know how to code. If you know C++ in and out, games are then slightly easier than impossible. But if you don't know a thing about programming, you can't make a game yourself.

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Original post by Tac-Tics
Quote:
Original post by JohnBSmall
Start Here.
Python.


Agreed. Learn programming first. Games are impossibly difficult to write if you don't know how to code. If you know C++ in and out, games are then slightly easier than impossible. But if you don't know a thing about programming, you can't make a game yourself.

[advocate]Game Maker will allow the user to create his game with basic steps, basically drag and drop. as the user moves into more concise or advanced game making the user will be introduced to coding through the scripting language.[/advocate]

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Start with c++. I learned it before looking back at C. Getting a C book or C++ book, you will learn them both in a way. As stated c++ is a newer c. Dont learn gamemaker, its for posers. Read up on c++ and then learn a 2d api, and after a year you should be able to make some pretty cool stuff.

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Original post by kingsrookie
Open GL is an api used to create the graphics for the game and is the linux distro version to microsoft's directx.

Nota bene: Pretty much all of that is wrong.

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Original post by dpadam450
Start with c++. I learned it before looking back at C. Getting a C book or C++ book, you will learn them both in a way. As stated c++ is a newer c. Dont learn gamemaker, its for posers. Read up on c++ and then learn a 2d api, and after a year you should be able to make some pretty cool stuff.

or you can make some pretty cool games in less than 3 months...... shall i remind you this a game development site not a "hey look my digital programming wang causes me to post more than yuo! site. Game Maker is fine if he wants to make games. In the meanwhile, he'll being introduced to the basics of programming through the scripting language. If he wants to learn how to program AND make games then the OP should look into the links provided by JohnB.

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Original post by Tac-Tics
If you know C++ in and out, games are then slightly easier than impossible. But if you don't know a thing about programming, you can't make a game yourself.


How can you know C++ in and out, and not know about programming?

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I second the python post. If you don't much/any experience in programming, it can be a relatively easy way to ease into it. Here is an article to give you an idea of what will be involved. After you become more comfortable to the world of programming then moving onto C or C++ becomes a much more easier transition.

Of course if you want to learn C/C++, there is nothing stopping you but don't expect results overnight.

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Original post by Lazy Foo
Quote:
Original post by Tac-Tics
If you know C++ in and out, games are then slightly easier than impossible. But if you don't know a thing about programming, you can't make a game yourself.


How can you know C++ in and out, and not know about programming?


I was using C++ and programming synonymously. What good would my comment be if it didn't try to confuse? =-P

Drag and drop game making is neat and I'm sure you can make a fantastic game, but general programming skills -- while requiring a lot more time and energy -- will probably pay off much more down the line.

To paraphrase the proverb: Teach a man a gamemaker and he will make games for a day. Teach a man to program, and he will make games for life (and probably other great applications as well).

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Original post by Tac-Tics
To paraphrase the proverb: Teach a man a gamemaker and he will make games for a day. Teach a man to program, and he will make games for life (and probably other great applications as well).

You misphrase: Let a n00b, who a game designer, post asking for a programer, graphics artist, and a musician to make a game and he will make games for a day (if he's lucky). Give a man the tools to make a game and he will make games for life. [smile]

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[QUOTE]Open GL is an api used to create the graphics for the game and is the linux distro version to microsoft's directx.[/QUOTE]

Opengl is used for more than just linux games; it's also used by Windows, MacOSX, and a handful of other Operating systems, as well as the Playstation 3.

[QUOTE]OpenGL doesn't create graphics for games.[/QUOTE]

no, but it does render them.

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Definitely Python.

You don't have to learn one language and stick with it forever. There is also no "one language" for game programming. You can always learn C or C++ later on, and the skills you learn from Python will definitely apply there as well.

Python is much easier for a beginner to pick up than C/C++, and will teach you much more about programming an actual game (as opposed to setup code and other stupid things necessary in C and C++).

Finally, Python isn't just some "beginner language" that you're going to use as a stepping stone to other languages. Python is a real programming language used in the games industry and elsewhere, and is indispensible for writing utilities and other scripts you'll use later on. I use it a lot.

I would strongly suggest against starting with C or C++.

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Original post by Ra
I would strongly suggest against starting with C or C++.


Seconded. It's popular, but C++ simply isn't the best language out there. It's basically just a set of OOP hacks on top of C. The only reasons it is still used as much as it is in the games industry are:

1.) Entire codebases are written in C++, and it would be too much trouble to convert all those lines to something like C# or Java.

2.) A great many API's are designed with C++ in mind, including PC market leaders DirectX and OpenGL.

If you want to get a job in the games industry any time soon, you will have to learn C++ eventually (because it won't be going anywhere for a while), but you shouldn't limit yourself to just that.

Anyway... starting with a GameMaker wouldn't be a bad idea. Most have their own built-in scripting system, which can serve as an excellent introduction to "real" programming.

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*bangs head on desk*

What is with this inceasant need to dumb down the learning process?

I say jump in the water and start off with C++. It worked for me and a lot of people on this forum.

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Original post by Lazy Foo
*bangs head on desk*

What is with this inceasant need to dumb down the learning process?

I say jump in the water and start off with C++. It worked for me and a lot of people on this forum.


agreed. My theory on why stuff like .net and python are so becoming popular is because people keep associating C++ with the Win32 API, which is quite possibly the most frustrating way to set up a window there is. They don't realise that with stuff like GLUT and SDL, the process of setting up windows isn't that hard. And lets face it: once you finish setting up the window and start using stuff like Opengl and Direct3d, all languages are essentially equally hard because the API requires the same functions to be called no matter what language you use.

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