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NUCLEAR RABBIT

Question About Logic

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Hello. I was wondering if doing puzzles such as sudoku puzzles would help any in programming? Its nothing with coding, but i think it helps with logical problem solving. Post any of your thoughts/concerns/suggestions on how to improve logical thinking/solving skills, and if you think thats a good way to improve on it. Thanks. Heres a Link for an example of sudoku puzzles: SUDOKU PUZZLE

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Quote:
Original post by NUCLEAR RABBIT
I was wondering if doing puzzles such as sudoku puzzles would help any in programming?


What do you mean?

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If you want to improve your logical thinking/algorithm design, etc., then you want to check out UVA's amazing ACM problemset archive (here).

It won't really help you with your software dev architecture/design skills, but that's not the point either. I think it may be exactly what you're looking for. I spend a good amount of time on there solving their problems.

Edit: That being said, the project I'm thinking of getting into next (before getting back on the ole real graphical game coding thing), is a very similar thing. Get my AI on :).

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I think it does. Also, games such as chess should also help your programming a lot since they present you with a situation, where you have to make a decision and have to carry out the decison. There is a consequence for each action, similar to programming. In this perspective chess would be similar to programming as far as problem solving is concerned.

My personal favourite is reading and trying to understand obfuscated code. Its so pointless but it's fun, even though the chances of someone actually understanding the code is 0.00000000001%.

http://www1.us.ioccc.org/years.html

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Quote:
Original post by NUCLEAR RABBIT
Hello.

I was wondering if doing puzzles such as sudoku puzzles would help any in programming? Its nothing with coding, but i think it helps with logical problem solving.

Post any of your thoughts/concerns/suggestions on how to improve logical thinking/solving skills, and if you think thats a good way to improve on it. Thanks.

Heres a Link for an example of sudoku puzzles: SUDOKU PUZZLE


I'd say problem solving in any domain will help with problem solving in other domains.

Any of the puzzles you find in the newspaper are good (Sudoku, crosswords, bridge, daily jumble). Any hobby that involves tinkering is good. Basically, I think a programmer who keeps a garden will be better at problem solving while coding than a programmer who's just a programmer. Broaden your experience, you can't go wrong.

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In my opinion this is what separates people that can program from those that cannot. Abstract thought is a learned skill. We are not born with the ability to think in terms of non-physical objects. Abstract thought is tied directly with our ability to associate.

Too many people try to tackle logic and abstraction through methods that have been designed by people that already know how to think in those terms(eg puzzles). Personally I've found that by taking code that makes no sense whatsoever to me and applying the theory behind it to things I do understand I can go back and grasp the original intent; hence increasing my ability to think abstractly.

My only point is that if you are trying to learn to think abstractly, it's going to be difficult by it's nature! Abstract thought is abstract lol. Instead of tackling it head on, go at it sideways. Take abstract theory and apply it to concepts you understand. Personally I use sports. Sports works well for me because it's a game of numbers, just like code. In the end I suspect it doesn't matter what leverage you select as long as you understand it. Association is a powerful tool when learning anything, it's how our brain stores memory and the recollection of said memory.

I cannot say if things like crossword puzzles, chess, sudoku, physics puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, word association, lateral thinking puzzles and any other number of 'logic' games will help. People tend to be either good at all of these things mentioned or not at all. It's not the puzzles that got them 'good' it's the actual thought process that occurs while doing them. Association, that's the key in my humble opinion.

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