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davidoSolight

complete begginer! not a clue about any thing!

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I am completely new to programming and i am finding it hard to get the answears to the following things! 1) Can I write C++ in notepad or wordpad?? 2) Which free compiler is good for C++? 3) Is there any sites that explain C++ in fine detail? (if so what are they?) 4) Is there anything else i need to know before i start?

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I would suggest you do your coding in an IDE (Intergated Development Enviroment). It will help you a lot. It will color syntax your code, help you find errors and give some help documentation.

theTroll

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Quote:
Original post by davidoSolight
3) Is there any sites that explain C++ in fine detail? (if so what are they?)


Agree with everything above, although if you are planning to learn C++ in-depth you will probably want to invest in a book on the subject (do an amazon.com search for some good choices).

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thanks for all the replies guys, ive downloaded visual C++ (think its a 30 day trial though!) still finding it hard to learn the code though! for example i found a tutorial that begins from the basics heres the bit ive done so far:

/* my first program in C++
with more comment */

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
cout << "My first program" ; // displays "my first program"
cout << "i am a C++ program" ; // displays "i am a C++ program"
return 0;
}

Now what i want to know is do u have to type '#include <iostream>' at th start of all your 'projects'? it explains why its put in there but i mean give it to me in English please!lol the line below it also means nothing to me! did the rest of you guys find it this hard to begin writing aswell??

remember i am a total begginer and i just want to learn some of this dam code before i goto university next year!!

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An #indlude tells the compiler to add code from another library to your program. istream is used for basic input and output using streams. You will use includes all the time to add external functionality to your code. You will even include your own files as your project gets larger.

As for using iostream in every project, it depends on how you are going to communicate with your program, uses the consel program the iostream will pretty much be in every program.

theTroll

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Quote:

thanks for all the replies guys, ive downloaded visual C++ (think its a 30 day trial though!) still finding it hard to learn the code though! for example i found a tutorial that begins from the basics heres the bit ive done so far:

/* my first program in C++
with more comment */

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
cout << "My first program" ; // displays "my first program"
cout << "i am a C++ program" ; // displays "i am a C++ program"
return 0;
}

Now what i want to know is do u have to type '#include <iostream>' at th start of all your 'projects'? it explains why its put in there but i mean give it to me in English please!lol the line below it also means nothing to me! did the rest of you guys find it this hard to begin writing aswell??

remember i am a total begginer and i just want to learn some of this dam code before i goto university next year!!


Just from the sounds of it, you didn't get the C++ express edition. Express is free for life if you get it before Septemberish?. Also in Express they use a weird version of:

int main() // int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) <~~ this is Express

and :

#include <iostream> //becomes #include "stdafx.h"

The include directive is there to insert header files that tells your program which libraries/modules ect to use. They define functions that are built independently of the C++ compiler. Using Express (and perhaps others I don't know) you can insert all of your headers into the single stdafx.h header, then just call it.

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no i def got th express edition, ive got th 2005 express edition, and i think it is free. maybe uve got a diff version of express C++ i think i will buy a book. it would be a wise investment i think. all the internet tutorials are to confusing and varied i think.

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If you are a complete beginner to the world of programming then the best advice I can give is, don't start with C or C++. When you are learning to program for the first time many things will come at you all at once. The important part now is learning to design and code algorithms.

C++ is a system-level language. To use it well, it requires a decent understanding of computers and the platform on which your program will run. You will find it very difficult to learn the syntax of the language, the nature of computers and OSes in general, and basic programming practices all at the same time.

On top of this is the fact that the language does not have any native input/output aside from some low-level I/O, basic file operations and console stuff. No graphics, no windows, no sounds, nothing. In order to gain access to all of that, you will need to use various other libraries, which translates to more being thrown at you at the same time.


You may wish to try starting with something lighter. Like a scripting language or such. I've not had the chance to use Python, but I hear it is great for beginners and experienced programmers alike. If you are still intent on starting with C++, then yes, Microsoft has just recently made their entire Express edition package free to download and use for life. And I couldn't recommend anything better for Windows develpment. While your at it, you may even want to try out the Visual Basic or C# languages first.

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