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C++ or VB programming???

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VB is easier to learn, so if you've never programmed, you should go with VB. Its probably powerful enough to let you do any game you'll have the desire to do.

That said, the games industry is 99% ruled by C++. Once you'll be comfortable with VB, its quite easy to learn the specificities of C++ and switch from a language to another.

Hope this helps

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It depends on your intelligence. If you can learn how to fly before you can walk then choose C++ for your games otherwise start on VB. C++ however is the best base language for making games.

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Quote:
Original post by xEricx
Once you'll be comfortable with VB, its quite easy to learn the specificities of C++ and switch from a language to another.


You've never had to correct a VB programmer's C++ code.

I say C++. It worked for me and all my friends.

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No, but I've had to correct bad programmers' C++ code. I don't think VB makes poor C++ coders...

I learned VB in school, learned C++ by myself... not that my VB experience helped me much, but it certainly didn't hinder my progress.

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Original post by xEricx
I don't think VB makes poor C++ coders...


Your right it doesn't. It's bad VB programming teachers* that create bad C++ programmers.

*and by VB teachers I mean a math teacher that took a course in VB at a junior college and got assigned to a high school class because the school wouldn't get a decent teacher.

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When you are about to learn a new language, why not C# ? It has a C++ like syntax and is secured/wrapped like visual basic?

Anyway, a programming lanugage is just a tool that serves a purpose. Take souch kind of tool that will most quickly and easliy do your job. With C/C++ it will take years to gain the required knowledge. With C# you will much earlier have great results.

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Original post by Samurai Jack
With C/C++ it will take years to gain the required knowledge. With C# you will much earlier have great results.


It took me (and the other 20 people in my intro to C/C++ class) 5 months.

(here we go again...)

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Lets not start a language war :)

With the new .NET system, C# is pretty much the same thing as VB, the only thing that changes is syntax.

As for C++ requiring years... well, its true in part... but even after a few months you can have results, probably suboptimal results, but you'll have results.

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Something you may have gathered from the above posts (if you ignore thier little jabs at each other) is that there isn't really a best language to use. Learning to program is difficult; learning a programming language is (generally) not. Once you get a good understanding of programming using one language, you'll find it's not all that difficult to pick up and learn a new one.

When you ask a question like this you're basically only getting the opinions of various individuals, there isn't a definitive correct answer. Often you'll simply have the favorite language of a given poster recommended, or the language they learnt it. This does for me as well, I can only give you an opinion.


So, all this discussion isn't really helping you, should you learn C++ or VB?
You can get the tools for either for free. There are free online tutorials for both. The same is likely true of any other languages you might look at. I suggest you pick one and try it out - if you don't like it or are having too much trouble with it, try the other. You could even search for some tutorials in each and have a look at which you think might be easier before you start out. Once you decide on a language you can then think of purchasing some books or whatnot. Keep in mind that learning any programming language will most likely be challenging when it's your first challenge, so you do need to persist with it to a certain degree.

You'll probably find that Visual Basic will be the simpler of the two, but people have different learning styles, and it's quite possible you'll have no trouble with C++.

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Quote:
Original post by Kazgoroth
Something you may have gathered from the above posts (if you ignore thier little jabs at each other) is that there isn't really a best language to use. Learning to program is difficult; learning a programming language is (generally) not. Once you get a good understanding of programming using one language, you'll find it's not all that difficult to pick up and learn a new one.


Correctomundo. Its difficult to comprehend at first but learning how to program & in a lesser sense how the cpu is going to process your code is far more beneficial than trying to learn a specific language. Once you know what goes on under the hood it really is just a case of learning the syntax and how one language differs from another.

I'd personally recommend that you dont use VB. It's not because the language is worse than any other but if your looking to understand what the CPU is doing then VB hides that from you. I'd recommend you try Java or C# (they hides alot from you too! but in a nicer way :). They are not as complicated as C++ however the code isn't too different from C++. Once you've been introduced to some concepts and are progressing through your language of choice I'd say to download the Visual C++ Express compiler and try implementing what you have done. This will allow you to see the differences and will ease you in gently.

Good luck

Ste



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(Forward note, I'm not trying to bash VB).

VB is a good language and it is good at what it does. VB was basically designed for Rapid Application Development. It does fast GUI creation in Windows very well, especially since the invent of .NET. (The same can be said for C# and J# using the proper IDE as well). In my experience, VB had a bad habit of corrupting. What I mean to say is I saw a lot of fellow students who learned VB first and when they had another language like C++ or Java thrown at them, they immediately said "Well it would be easier to do it in VB". One thing to remember is that overall, VB is Windows only.

I would say take a look at C++, Java, or C#.

It's a matter of finding the right tool for the right job.

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I've only been around for a month or so, but already I've seen about 20 of these type posts. At first I'd try to argue my pov about a particular language over another, then it dawned on me...

The most difficult aspect of learning to code is logic/program design. The beauty of this is that it can be learned in ANY language. From pascal to C# logic is logic. The differences between Visual Basic and C++ come down to syntax (yeah yeah, don't nitpick!). Once you learn HOW to code, it becomes much easier to pick up any given language.

With that mindset the question isn't "Which language is best to learn Game Design?" it becomes "Which language is best to learn Logic/Design?". From there you'll still get 20 different responses, but I think honestly it's the best question.

A few things to keep in mind while searching, Object Orientation has become the defacto standard of program design. Older versions of VB (pre .net) do not support full fledged oop. C++ does, however it's idea/syntax of oop is quite different from most. Find a language that you'll feel comfortable with, supports object orientation and start there.

C#, Python, Ruby, VB.net would be my suggestions, C#/VB.net are in essence the same language with different syntax. If you plan to move onto C++, C# will be the closest language to it as you'll get a feel for brackets, case sensitive use, and unsafe code (pointers). You might just find that once you learn C# that there is little need for C++. There are some opinions out there that suggest C# will take over much the same as C++ did over C. That statement is not a troll for argument, just the statement of few opinions floating around.

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Im gona be starten to learn programming in express 2005 and i WAS going to do it in C++ because that is the language that i will be learning in my universty course 'games technology'. However after asking on this forum which language i shud usei got very mixed replies. However the main thing that i learnt was that C++ is much harder than VB?? I have talked to a friend in my class in college and he said that i should learn in VB as it is easier. I am afraid that if i learn VB that i will not be able to adapt to C++?? Therefore would i be safer learning C or C#?? what is C# exactly and how does it differ from C and C++?? and finally will i be able move from C or C# easily to C++??

You have probably guessed that i am a complete begginer!lol please and try to answer these questions for me!!^^^^^

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Quote:
Original post by davidoSolight
i WAS going to do it in C++ because that is the language that i will be learning in my universty course 'games technology'.


In that case take C++. All other languages would be an uneeded detour.

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Erm......prolly gonna sound like I'm ranting, but WHAT is soooooo bad and difficult about learning C++? I learned C/C++ when I was a Junior in High School. It's not that hard. C is definitely more low-level, and arguably more difficult, but why do people insist on steering newcomers away from jumping right in?

And to be perfectly honest, I hated the course at first. That was not because it was hard. In fact, I could do everything we had to do. I just hated programming. There was a moment, however, when, all of a sudden, I said "I *want* to do this" I just realized that I wanted to program. If this moment has already come to you, I say go straight for C++.

After a couple months in that class, I had learned the basics of C/C++ and could have made lots of simple, but useful programs that a business could require, and even made an attandance-taking program for the school with my classmates. Practical, useful, working, real-world product after a couple months.... It is possible!

You don't need to know all of C++ to be able to make good programs. You can learn what you need as you go along. Yes, it may take a longer time to become a really good coder, but I think it is worth it. Its better to take your time and know what you are doing well than to have a vague idea of how to do everything. I think people have less respect for<cliche>a jack of all trades, master of none</cliche> than for someone who know less things but knows them well.

Sorry for ranting....

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To me, I think it matters on what you want. If you want an easy language that will basically hold your hand, then VB will be the way to go...IMHO! Now, if you want to do Programming maybe as a profession, then I suggest to go ahead and jump into C++. If you find that you don't like it, then go with VB. I say try them both out. You never know, you could be a person who gets the hang of C++ really fast. I mean, to learn C++ syntax really dosen't take that long. But, learning WHEN to use stuff, now that can be the hard part about C++. In C++ there are MANY ways to get stuff done. Some people use Pointers on some stuff and some people get the same thing done using References. Now, I will quit right there, because I don't want to go into detail what they are since you are programming. So, hey...give them both a try.

I started learning VB first. Did one program and didn't like it. So, I tried C++. I loved it! That is just me.

At the end, it matters on what you want. I hope this has helped you even a tiny bit on your choice.

Here are some C++ tutorials:
http://www.cprogramming.com
http://cplusplus.com/

Hope those work! have fun programming!

Chad.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
It's not really what languages you know that's important. It's whether or not you actually know how to program.

Syntax isn't important. There are very few people (I would say none, but I don't want to argue) who know everything about any one language off the top of their head. That is why there are multitudes of textbooks available on every topic you could imagine.

With that being said I don't think that anyone can truly be a good programmer having only ever coded in one language. While I prefer to use and most often use C++ to program, I wouldn't be as good of a programmer as I am now had I not learned other languages/paradigms during my education.

One thing about C/C++ that is very important to understand however is pointers/references. These may seem to be C/C++ only things, but the better you understand them, the better you will understand other languages that simply abstract out the use of pointers(ie: Java).

I'd never only list 1 language to learn, so if I had to list any 2 languages to start with, I'd go with Java and C++. They're pretty accessible, popular, and well documented. Of course these are just my suggestions. Choose whatever you want, but again, the emphasis should not be placed on the language but instead on the actual programming method.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well... the guy asked what language to learn for GAME PROGRAMING. In the game programing industry there is, at the current time, only one good answer, and that's C++. VB will never be used on a large scale in game programming, so there... However, it is true that mastering C++ takes a loooong time, however, wouldn't the time spent learning VB be better used at trying to understand C++. Granted, it will take you a while untill u'll write your own first game (unless you start with "Guess a number" which is not such a bad suggestion), but you got to start somewhere. Good luck, and most of all, patience and determination. Don't give up, just learn little by little

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
Well... the guy asked what language to learn for GAME PROGRAMING. In the game programing industry there is, at the current time, only one good answer, and that's C++.

a) What about the many companies still making use of C?
b) What about the increasing number of companies using different languages in addition to or instead of C and/or C++?
c) He never said he wanted to enter the industry.
d) Assuming he does want to enter the industry, you have no idea of the expected timeline. In all probability he has plenty of time to learn with a different language and move over to C++ if he so desires.

I'm not saying don't learn C++ - and it's certainly a perfectly acceptable choice - but it is not the only choice.

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