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What should I learn to start programming. I want to learn to make games and I am not sure what to learn.

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Games are a specialized type of software. If you haven't built basic software programs such as Notepad, database management programs, etc., I'd suggest doing that first then pick up on games. If you plan to go pro, C++ is a good starting point. If its just for hobbying, either Java or C# would work.

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No, no, I meant my long term goal is to make a game, but I just need to know what direction to go in. Thanks for the help.

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You have a lot of choices, but just start programming. You can begin with C++ since it is a general & well used language, freely download Visual C++ 2005 Express (google), and learn C++ at www.functionx.com.

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I think if your just starting out, the best thing to do is to concentrate on the fundamentals of programming, such as variables, constants, loops, operator precedence etc... start off with a basic book of ANSI C or ANSI C++ and go from there. start off slowly as trying to do too much can be overwhelming for some and may be counter productive which will be a hindrance to your motivation.


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You could try Python, I'm enjoying learning it.

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you don't neccesarily need to learn to program at all. You've already got plenty of recommendations for programming languages, so I won't add any of those - if you want to learn to program just pick a language and start learning; if you tell us your choice I'm sure we can advise you on some resources for that specific language.

But first, did I just say you might not need to program? Yep. [smile] You may be able to create your game using a program such as Game Maker or Adventure Game Studio. These programs make it easier to create simple games using click&drag interfaces and setting options, as well as providing some scripting capabilities that will allow more complex things to be made. You can make some very good games using these sort of tools, and it'll probably be faster and easier than learning to program - the tradeoff for that is that you're restricted somewhat by what the programs are capable of doing, so if your idea is too complex or to different from what the program author intended you may not be able to create it with these programs. Just thought I'd present the other option since everyone else has been talking about programming.

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come on Kazgoroth, who really wants to use a click 'n' drag game maker lol, learn a language and join us all at 2:00AM dosed up on coffee pumping out streams of code ;) you can't beat that feeling lol

but I agree with Kazgoroth, if your more of the 'artistic' type then a game maker would be better as coding may be not what you want to do, but considering you did state what language, I would stick with the C family of programming languages :) they will be around for eternity ;)


















psst... C++ :p

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Quote:
Original post by nullsmind
Games are a specialized type of software. If you haven't built basic software programs such as Notepad, database management programs, etc., I'd suggest doing that first then pick up on games. If you plan to go pro, C++ is a good starting point. If its just for hobbying, either Java or C# would work.

Quote:

You have a lot of choices, but just start programming. You can begin with C++ since it is a general & well used language, freely download Visual C++ 2005 Express (google), and learn C++ at www.functionx.com.

Ok, I hate doing this, but rating-- for that bucket of ignorance and misinformation.

Could we pleeeease refrain from burdening beginners of all people with our own personal preferences and completely baseless advice based on nothing but our own lack of experience? Thank you.

C++ is not a particularly good starting point. It is *a* starting point. But only a beginner who chose C++ and is still learning it would ever say it's a *good* starting point.
And the Java/C# comment are just plain wrong. Both languages are perfectly capable of producing professional games.


Quote:

come on Kazgoroth, who really wants to use a click 'n' drag game maker lol, learn a language and join us all at 2:00AM dosed up on coffee pumping out streams of code ;) you can't beat that feeling lol

Read the first reply in this thread. If the OP wants to make games then these tools are excellent starting points.
If he wants to program games, they might not cut it. It's not neccesarily about being an "artistic type", but simply wanting to get your game done, rather than fret over nonsenlical code.

Moreover, there was a big game development contest here last summer (4e4). Guess who won? A guy using these drag & drop tools. And not because the other entries sucked. Far from it.

Quote:

considering you did state what language, I would stick with the C family of programming languages :) they will be around for eternity ;)

psst... C++ :p


Here we go again. Who gives a damn how long a language will be around? How does that help the OP?

How about instead suggesting a language that is good for people learning programming?
Oh wait, you might not have the general programming knowledge/experience required to make that recommendation. So you settle for cheerleading and pushing *your* language mindlessly?
I'm sure we all appreciate that.

And if this sounds harsh, well, it probably is. But I'm so tired of seeing people who know *one* language (or half of one, even) preach about choice of programming languages.

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When i decided to try and make games i wanted to jump into it right away. But it is more complicated than that. If you choose C++ i would reccommend learning the language a bit first then put what u know into game programming...as a first book i would reccomend C++ Without Fear by Brian Overland.
Good luck in ur adventures

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first of all, get off your high horse Spoonbender, I don't know WHAT your problem is but your post is rather less than useful so your a hippocrite moaning at other people who are trying to help, ATLEAST they replied with a constructive message, your just ranting rubbish.

the reason I said C++ because it is a fast and powerful language and it's worth learning, afterall MOST of the games companies require you to know C++.

what's the point of learning a language such as Turbo Pascal when it is a dead language, althought you can go on to Delphi. C++ is a wise choice for anything learning a language.

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Here's my opinion on the whole programming languages thing:

Anyone can be taught to use a language, whether it's COBOL or HASKELL. To be able to program (games or otherwise) is not a skill that depends on what language you use. Rather, it depends on the methods and principles of software development that persist regardless of what language you decide to use.

Anyways, that having been said, there are a myriad of languages available, but if you want to learn a language that has TONS of game development related examples pick something popular: C++, Java, Python, etc.

Anyways, that's just my 2 cents.

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C++ is a wise choice for anything learning a language.


Perhaps in your opinion.

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Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Quote:

C++ is a wise choice for anything learning a language.


Perhaps in your opinion.


and the opinion of MOST game companies

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Quote:
Original post by electronix
Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Quote:

C++ is a wise choice for anything learning a language.


Perhaps in your opinion.


and the opinion of MOST game companies


No, I doubt game companies give a crap which language you learnt first.

Generally, people are recommend:
- Learn to program
- Learn different programming languages.

The first step is learning how to program by creating programs, it doesn't matter what language you learn first because you're only interested in learning the concepts of programming: variables, OOP, etc.

Next you learn the languages which will be useful to what you want to do. So if you want to develop games learn one of the popular languages for game development: C++/C/C#/Java/etc.

Some people recommend learning C++ first to do the two jobs at the same time, whereas others recommend learning an easier language (say, Java/C#/Python) so you can concentrate on learning the concepts of programming rather than getting bogged down by a difficult language such as C++.

... IMO.

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Quote:
Original post by electronix
Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Quote:

C++ is a wise choice for anything learning a language.


Perhaps in your opinion.


and the opinion of MOST game companies
Methinks most game companies want you to be able to program already, not learn on their time.

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Quote:
Original post by electronix
Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Quote:

C++ is a wise choice for anything learning a language.


Perhaps in your opinion.


and the opinion of MOST game companies


That's mainly just because the people who already work for them don't know anything else. The best plan is to learn as many languages as possible; once you get used to it, you can switch to anything you want in a matter of hours. So there's nothing wrong with starting out with a language like Python, making some simple games on your own, playing with some other languages like Visual Basic or C#, and then eventually moving on to C++ when you get to a situation where you really need it (like getting a job in the industry).

Besides, it's beginning to change. An increasing number of firms are writing their tools in C# and the other .NET languages. Places like Crytek are making heavy use of languages like Lisp. Many other places are using languages like Lua for their scripting. Even Tim Sweeny, the guy in charge of the Unreal Engine, wants to move it away from C++ and into a (as yet nonexistant) language that isn't prone to things like uninitialised variable bugs or null pointer dereferences.

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Quote:
Original post by superpig
So there's nothing wrong with starting out with a language like Python, making some simple games on your own, playing with some other languages like Visual Basic or C#, and then eventually moving on to C++ when you get to a situation where you really need it (like getting a job in the industry).


In theory that's a good idea, in practice it isn't.

I'm my college your path goes:

Intro to programming -> programming in python -> programming in C# -> programming in C/C++ -> advanced C++ programming

Starting with C++ goes:

Intro to programming -> programming in C/C++ -> advanced C++ programming -> (insert language here)

Either way the student is making games after the second semester, the difference is the C++ programmer is learning what he'll be using as a game programmer when he graduates in 4-6 years and he can easily absorb any other language the industry can change to.

and this is assuming they want to work as a game programmer, otherwise language doesn't matter.

[Edited by - Lazy Foo on May 6, 2006 10:20:31 PM]

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