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Alpha_ProgDes

I'm a Scheme user

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[grin]

Good point. Well I just downloaded the Scheme interpreter and wanted to know where should I start as far as learning to program in Scheme? Should I try to emulate some program I made in C, C++, or Java? Should I start from scratch with a tutorial and "Hello World"? Or should I go a different route altogether?

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[grin]

Good point. Well I just downloaded the Scheme interpreter and wanted to know where should I start as far as learning to program in Scheme? Should I try to emulate some program I made in C, C++, or Java? Should I start from scratch with a tutorial and "Hello World"? Or should I go a different route altogether?


Oh, so this isn't a drunk post (I actually thought it was), not because of spelling (which is good enough) it just sounded like you wanted to tell us you are a Scheme user for no apparent reason. Anyway you should try to do simple programs you have done before, stuff like calculating Fibonacci numbers (in a recursive/iterative way of course, don't use Binet's formula). When you start getting to the somewhat more advanced concepts you should try using them in a little larger project. Also if the resource you are learning from have any examples try them out.

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[grin]

Good point. Well I just downloaded the Scheme interpreter and wanted to know where should I start as far as learning to program in Scheme? Should I try to emulate some program I made in C, C++, or Java? Should I start from scratch with a tutorial and "Hello World"? Or should I go a different route altogether?


It would help to know the interpreter you got. The Scheme standard library is very small, so many interpreters have non-standard extensions.

But anyway. You might want to learn about the functional paradigm (as it applies to dynamically typed languages), it's pretty important in Scheme. The SICP (pronounced "sick-pea" in case you were wondering) book and Abelson and Sussman video lectures are classics which may help.

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the little schemer is a good book. There is also Structure and Interpretation of computer programs if you want a heavier read. http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

If you want something more indepth start here:)
http://www.swiss.csail.mit.edu/projects/scheme/

I'm not sure if your sold on scheme or if you just want to learn functional programming. If its the latter, may I recommend lisp?? Google lisp-in-a-box. Peter Siebel has open sourced an excelled book called practical common lisp if your interested.

Cheers
Chris

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the little schemer is a good book. There is also Structure and Interpretation of computer programs if you want a heavier read. http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

If you want something more indepth start here:)
http://www.swiss.csail.mit.edu/projects/scheme/

I'm not sure if your sold on scheme or if you just want to learn functional programming. If its the latter, may I recommend lisp?? Google lisp-in-a-box. Peter Siebel has open sourced an excelled book called practical common lisp if your interedted.

Cheers
Chris


I will assume you mean Common Lisp by "lisp." In my opinion, Scheme encourages functional programming more than Common Lisp. It is also generally used more in Scheme. I recommend you learn both though. Common Lisp has more powerful metaprogramming features than the Scheme standard (however, non-standard extensions by some interpreters/compilers have made it just as powerful) while Scheme (as I said) is used more for functional programming. Both metalinguistic programming and functional programming are good to know about.

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Quote:
Original post by chollida1
the little schemer is a good book. There is also Structure and Interpretation of computer programs if you want a heavier read. http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

If you want something more indepth start here:)
http://www.swiss.csail.mit.edu/projects/scheme/

I'm not sure if your sold on scheme or if you just want to learn functional programming. If its the latter, may I recommend lisp?? Google lisp-in-a-box. Peter Siebel has open sourced an excelled book called practical common lisp if your interedted.

Cheers
Chris


I will assume you mean Common Lisp by "lisp." In my opinion, Scheme encourages functional programming more than Common Lisp. It is also generally used more in Scheme. I recommend you learn both though. Common Lisp has more powerful metaprogramming features than the Scheme standard (however, non-standard extensions by some interpreters/compilers have made it just as powerful) while Scheme (as I said) is used more for functional programming. Both metalinguistic programming and functional programming are good to know about.


I agree that scheme promotes a more functional programming approach. I just find lisp(common lisp) to be the more practical of the 2 languages due to the larger number of libraries available for it:)


Cheers
Chris

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Quote:
Original post by chollida1
Quote:
Original post by Roboguy
Quote:
Original post by chollida1
the little schemer is a good book. There is also Structure and Interpretation of computer programs if you want a heavier read. http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

If you want something more indepth start here:)
http://www.swiss.csail.mit.edu/projects/scheme/

I'm not sure if your sold on scheme or if you just want to learn functional programming. If its the latter, may I recommend lisp?? Google lisp-in-a-box. Peter Siebel has open sourced an excelled book called practical common lisp if your interedted.

Cheers
Chris


I will assume you mean Common Lisp by "lisp." In my opinion, Scheme encourages functional programming more than Common Lisp. It is also generally used more in Scheme. I recommend you learn both though. Common Lisp has more powerful metaprogramming features than the Scheme standard (however, non-standard extensions by some interpreters/compilers have made it just as powerful) while Scheme (as I said) is used more for functional programming. Both metalinguistic programming and functional programming are good to know about.


I agree that scheme promotes a more functional programming approach. I just find lisp(common lisp) to be the more practical of the 2 languages due to the larger number of libraries available for it:)


Cheers
Chris


PLT Scheme has a large extension to R5RS. That helps some.

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