Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
lordmenace

I really want to learn C++ with a passsion but...

This topic is 4392 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I don't know what program I am supposed to use. I have downloaded Microsoft Visual C++ express edition 2005(free). Is that all I need? I have seen a package (expensive) called Microsoft Visual Studio 2005. Is dev C++ good? Which is better? In terms of web design, you can make an html/php page with notepad, but notepad is a light weight compared to Microsfot Frontpage. Microsoft frontpage Doesn't hold a candle to Macromedia Dreamweaver. If I google "Learn C++" what software will they most likely be using for their tutorials? Thanks. I am so happy I found this community. Life dream to code a game ^_^.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
[edit] Since this is your first post, welcome to GDNet :)

Visual C++ 2005 Express is a great piece of software, free or no. You will be missing some of the features of the other editions, but if you are just learning C++, then it is more than enough. Just make sure you have read this and you should be good to go.

In the end, though, you should try Dev-C++ as well and see if you prefer it to VC Express. They are both good IDEs with good compilers (I prefer VC++ because it has a great debugger; I recommend you learn how to use one as early as possible, although it is not your first priority).

As for a good tutorial, take a look at Correct C++ Tutorial.


jfl.

[Edited by - jflanglois on May 18, 2006 12:44:04 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since you have already decided on your language, your next step would be to learn to use your language. Also i recommend reading this if you have not. Once you are fairly comfortable with C++, you could move on to using a library/engine to create your game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
if you are a beginner, it is probably a good idea to really check out the various alternatives to MSVC++ (i.e. DevC++ or CodeBlocks), simply because you are much more likely to learn MS specific C++ stuff that may not be applicable to or available on other platforms when using MSVC++.
DevC++ and CodeBlocks however do not directly support this stuff when using the MingW/GCC compiler suite, so you are sort of forced to learn the generic stuff first. Nevertheless, if you chose CodeBlocks, there won't be any problem switching backends (compilers) if you should have to, as it supports several compiler suites natively.
So, if you are interested in learning C++ in a fashion that is generally applicable to most settings, I would recommend not to use MSVC++ right from the beginning. Nevertheless MSVC++ is a great IDE and you are likely to miss a lot of features when programming in a different environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by lordmenace
If I google "Learn C++" what software will they most likely be using for their tutorials? Thanks.

Usually, tutorials will start out with developing console applications, that is it shouldn't matter what compiler you are using as long as it can be run from a shell and supports most of ISO C++.
Anyway, your safest bet would probably be the GCC compiler suite, simply because it is widely available and supported, and sooner or later you'll appreciate having learnt one tool for all platforms, rather than dozens of different compilers for each platform you may be interested doing development for.

PS: google for "C++ tutorial" too, as well as check out the GD.net resources, there are plenty of references available here.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Anybody wondering what approach to take or what tools to use when learning C++, check out the following webpage:
http://www.goingware.com/tips/fundamentals.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most programming examples and library source code out there is written with VC++ version 6.
VC++ 2005 express is able to open and convert a VC++ 6 project so thats not a problem.

This explains what you need in addition to the MSVC++ 2005 express IDE.
If I remember correct you need to upgrade to SP2 and install Microsoft Platform SDK.
Update some files and settings (as described in the link) and your good to go.

Personally I have both CodeBlocks and MSVC++ 2005 express installed.
CodeBlocks is fast and less CPU/Memory intensive than MSVC++ so I prefer it for simple test applications and small projects

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There really isn't that much language difference between gcc and visual c++ anymore. the 2005 compiler is very standard compliant, so don't be affraid that you learn wrong c++ or something.

I really recommend you to use visual c++ express edition. With the open source ides like dev-c++ and code blocks, you will get all kinds of weird problems, which have some obscure reason, and it would be a shame if you get discouraged because of a bad ide. Visual C++ just works, and you can really focus on the actual c++ programming. Plus the things like having a good debugger and intellisense really make your coding experience a lot better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by quasar3dand intellisense really make your coding experience a lot better.


I agree that the intellisense provided by C++ has been quicker in writing out function definition parameter lists however I think the intellisense is quite poor. Visual Studio Express does not come with support for macros or add ins so Visual Assist X is out of reach.

I use it anyway because the express edition is good and you are allowed to distribute your .exe legally (I think you can even sell the software you create with express ed.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The MS Visual C++ Express is heaps better than DevC++ (IMO). The compiler is more standard compliant than other compilers on the market at the moment. The IDE has better features than DevC++ etc. Further much code on the net is made in VC++ workspaces/solutions which you can open in VC++ Express. In my world there's not even a contest here. DevC++ was great back in the day when MS didn't release a free VC++ version, and the MS compiler stunk. Not so anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!