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Shiny

Unity inline assembly for x64?

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I was reading the article in the DirectX SDK on porting binaries to x64 (as MS is saying that processor manufacturers will stop with 32bit chips this year...-- something I don't necessarily agree with, but understand their interest in getting devs up to speed...) Either way, was reading about this and found an interesting point or two about inline assemly. According to MS! -- Inline assembly is no longer possible when compiling for x64 platforms. MS suggests putting it into a separate file (which I have no problem with...) or avoiding it altogether, which would be nice -- but maybe infeasable for some people. So, I go and have a look about -- and I find this interview: Clicky My real thought is -- is this a big deal for people? I'm not certain about whether or not standards stipulate the necessity of having __ASM blocks capability for modern C/C++ compilers, but I don't see why MS would just ditch the possibility. Obviously, one reason they want to avoid it is so legacy apps with incompatible ASM don't break on x64 -- but is that really their (Microsoft's) job? They can't be responsible for everyone's software! ~Shiny.

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I think this is more of a case of MS saying their tools are going to work a certain way rather than an 'all tools will work this way' thing.

It probably makes compiler writing easier for one thing and it shouldn't impact most people as most wont need to go to that level and I dare say most that do go via the compiler intrinstics first rather than directly to the raw assembly.

I wouldn't be shocked if 32bit chips were stopped or at least reduced down a great deal in production this year, 64bit is here now and its going to stay, the software to take advantage of it would be nice (says someone who is using a 64bit version of windows) [grin]

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Quote:
Original post by Shiny
but is that really their (Microsoft's) job? They can't be responsible for everyone's software!
Sadly, Microsoft really is responsible for everyone's software.

Look at it like this. So you're running XP. Vista comes out and you buy it, and now some app of importance to you no longer runs, because they relied on the behavior of a certain bug. Once that bug was fixed, the app broke. Most people's reaction is "fuck Microsoft, they broke my program". Unlike the OSS world, MS does not have the freedom to tell the application developers to fix it or go to hell. They need to preserve existing apps if at all possible -- to the point that there is a folder in Windows XP with a bunch of DLLs which are loaded when certain known-broken applications are launched. These DLLs reintroduce operating system bugs on a per-application basis in order to keep those programs chugging despite critical coding errors.

Legacy support is a painful but critical part of Microsoft's reality, and they're working very hard to change that.

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