Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

pr0teus

CS Research Project

This topic is 6454 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I posted this in the lounge, nobody cared. Now I''m trying here. Hello, So, in my english class I''ve got to write a research paper on a future profession. Of course, I chose CS. Now, I have to get some information out of real people involved in this sort of thing. It doesn''t matter if you do games, or databases, or whatever. C/C++ programmers would be great, as that is what I''m most interested in, but are not necessary. The following is a list of general information I need to know. If you could, please just post a bit answering the questions. I would also like e-mail addresses in case I would like somebody to expand or just to get some more information. Your full name would nice, too, (for the citations). Keep in mind, you could also just be a student majoring in CS. The information I need is: Salary How to get in to the business Typical day at work Various aspects of your job (responsibilities, etc.) The "normal" type of person involved What kind of schooling did you take, and, if you would like to post it, degree requirements. Best part if the job. Worst part of the job. The most rewarding part of the job. Are you happy/sad/overworked/underworked at the career? Personality qualities and knowledge necessary for the job. Anything else you find noteworthy. Thank you, Ben ben@ageofzeppelin.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
First off, I''m still in high school, so take as much of what I''ve got as you feel as necessary. But first, a question. What kind of English class has you do research into professions? I had to do something similar in as U.S. History class, but it wasn''t FOR the class, it just happened to be during it.
Well, that off, I can''t answer most of those questions you posted, because I haven''t actually got a job in the computer business. Sorry.
First off, as far as I know, you don''t get a job in Computer Science, you get a job that uses it. You don''t need to even take computer science, technically, to get into a computer company. Get a start-up going, and you could be successful. Make some games, and make money. Take napster, which was begun by college kids. If you were smart enough, you could do something like that, hopefully without getting busted
Various aspects of job. Trust me, you could probably bs that. As well as a typical day. Do you know how to program? That''s what a typical day probably is, figuring out how to make a functioning utility. If you like to program, then what do you like about it? Dislike? Those would answer Best and Worst parts of job.
If you need actual people''s responses, sorry that I couldn''t give first hand information, but maybe one day, right?

I am Nobody, who are you? Are you Nobody too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

First off, as far as I know, you don''t get a job in Computer Science, you get a job that uses it.



This isn''t necessarily true. There is still a LOT of room for research in the field of computer science, and it is interesting enough that I''m seriously considering that as my career. That means working either for a private think tank, or for a research university. And this is actually work in Computer Science, as you study problems with no currently known solutions, or inefficient brute-force solutions, and try to generate new solutions. Cryptography is a very high profile example of this, but there are people working on all kinds of problems.

And I''d argue that those jobs ARE indeed in Computer Science. I just thought I''d throw that little bit in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey,

FIrst off, it''s just an 11th grade honors class, and just a research project. The teacher thought it would be cool to make the kids write 6 pages on a profession. She thought it would be even cooler if she made us get information from first hand sources, not just prewritten articles. So here I am.

Anyhow, I''m mostly looking for people with either experience in the field (relating to computer science: algorithms, design, programming, testing, maintaining, whatever deals with the idea through the marketing of a computer program. I guess I''m mostly interested in the software aspects, but hardware is cool too.) Now, you don''t necessairly have to be in the business right now. You could have majored in college or are majoring in college at it, or are a lowly intern at a company, or a high school teacher college professor who knows about it. Just somebody who knows more than bs-ing it. Hell, a high school kid like me who has researched this himself could help me out.

Thanks,

Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by pr0teus

I posted this in the lounge, nobody cared. Now I''m trying here.

Hello,
So, in my english class I''ve got to write a research paper on a future profession. Of course, I chose CS. Now, I have to get some information out of real people involved in this sort of thing. It doesn''t matter if you do games, or databases, or whatever. C/C++ programmers would be great, as that is what I''m most interested in, but are not necessary.

The following is a list of general information I need to know. If you could, please just post a bit answering the questions. I would also like e-mail addresses in case I would like somebody to expand or just to get some more information. Your full name would nice, too, (for the citations).

Keep in mind, you could also just be a student majoring in CS.

The information I need is:
Salary
How to get in to the business
Typical day at work
Various aspects of your job (responsibilities, etc.)
The "normal" type of person involved
What kind of schooling did you take, and, if you would like to post it, degree requirements.
Best part if the job.
Worst part of the job.
The most rewarding part of the job.
Are you happy/sad/overworked/underworked at the career?
Personality qualities and knowledge necessary for the job.
Anything else you find noteworthy.

Thank you,

Ben
ben@ageofzeppelin.com


There really isn''t an occupational field called CS so I am going to cover what I can in CS related field(s). The breadth of occupations that typically require a CS degree (I assume you mean degree) range from; Help-Desk Technician to Computer Engineer. The stereo-typical occupations are: Programmer, Systems Analyst, Network Administrator, Database Administrator, Software Engineer, Computer Engineer etc. Each of these positions are maintained "in-house" (company actually has a physical body performing the tasks) or "outsourced" to other firms or consultants. I personally work for the later as a consultant. At an occupational level, the positions may be further seperated by "tools" or "platforms". For example: let''s look at Programmer. There are thousands of jobs for programmer, to include "C/C++ Programmer", "COBOL Programmer" and "Visual Basic Programmer".

The typical salary ranges for these positions vary greatly but you can get a good feel for annual incomes by checking out www.salary.com - it''s a salary survey publisher for "typical" occupations and has regional and national figures. Salaries typically vary by region.

Most companies offer pay based on experience and require a BS/MS degree in college with x-years experience to even be considered. However, many companies have positions for "entry-level" meaning no-experience positions. It''s been my experience - through participation and observation - that a newcomer to the field will accept such a position (usually at a meager salary) and hold that position for their token 2-years.

Note: The questions seem to be getting more personalized now - therefore, so will the answers. As far as my salary goes, that''s personal and that''s why I directed you to the web-site above. But I will answer what I can with the others.

A typical day on the job for me is providing "behind the scenes" support for our product to our clients. Ok - So I''m providing support to the clients, how''s that behind the scenes? Well, a client who calls in wants to talk to the person they know - Consultant (we''re an HR Consulting firm). So our HR consultant takes the issues down and forwards them to me. I research the issue and provide a response to either the consultant or (on occasion) directly to the client.

Also, clients call with special request (customized report for instance). The consultant takes the notes regarding the clients request and again forwards them to me for processing. Upon completion of the special request I in turn provide the results to the consultant who forwards them to the client. I work with consultants throughout the country (15 or so in all) in this manner. Most of the times, the client doesn''t even know about my presence in the whole scheme of things. For those that do, they are only familiar with my name as the technical support contact for the software and rarely deal with me regarding program issues. They would much rather work with their assigned consultant because that''s who they see at the meetings and such.

I am one of the lucky ones in that I have nothing but a high-school diploma and a military record for schooling. What got my foot in the door - years ago - for my token 2-years was the fact that 95% of the office was prior-military with little or no college education. I got a break (and apparently that''s why they hired me - to give me a break). From that lucky moment in my career history, I have climbed the ladder of success to a point where I was happily accepted as an expert programmer (Clipper) and hired to be a consultant. My first client (as a consultant) was the company I work for now. I rewrote their applications and after the task was completed, they offered me a position and that''s how I got to do what I do.

To me the best part of the job is the coffee. They have French Vanilla, Irish cream, Almond Chocolate and more (each in regular an decaf). No, seriously though the best part of the job is the satisfaction I get when the client gets what they want which for reasons unknown, they thought was impossible to get. The worst part of the job is the fact that I am slowing becoming an HR guru instead of a programmer. I have always loved programming, that''s what I''m good at. I''m no good at trying to determine how much a person should be paid for their job, but that''s what I am being pulled towards. Oh well, such is life...

Personality requirements for my job -

Key: Patient! A lot of times, a client''s request is difficult to understand. And going through a middle-man makes it even tougher.

Regards,
Jumpster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also get salary info from http://www.datamasters.com/survey.html, which specializes in IT (or CS) related positions.

A typical day at work for me (I work at a start-up) involves:
* Checking the phone system for security messages
* Checking to make sure the Inet server is still operational by reading GameDev.net (honestly our Inet server does go down, and given my limited networking knowledge the only way I know how to check it is to actually try to surf the web. If the web isn''t working, I use one of the few Novell commands I know - "reset server")
* Attending occasional meetings
* Designing and planning projects
* Writing code in C++, C, Pascal, VB, Shell Script, AWK, actually, whatever laungage it needs to be done in, luckily after you learn a few languages the rest are a snap to learn.
* Helping out with manual work (we have no grunts, so the tech staff does double duty, which is fine with me, I hate sitting all day long)
* Do whatever the CEO says needs to be done.

The "normal" type of person in the IT field tends to be, well, normal. The really good IT people, though, tend to be a little on the weird side. You''ll find grown adults playing with toys at their desks, drawing cartoons on the whiteboard, and I personally have little 1/2 inch ninjas sitting on my computer tower to "ward off the evil computer spirits" I really don''t think IT people ever grow up (well, when they do they become managers or something).

My email addres (like most member''s) is in my profile (click the little icon above this message)

Micah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a Furby on my monitor and about 8-trolls that you''d get from McDonald''s floating about my desk. I have slinky (shape of a start) that I play with when my boss comes in to talk to me. I talk with my furby too... He helps me find bugs in code. My co-workers get a kick out of it...

Regards,
Jumpster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Man, those star-slinkies are pretty darn much a necessity in the programming field. I don''t think they''ll hire you without one.
farmersckn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!