Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

rodneyldixon

www.consoledev.com

This topic is 6488 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Ok. I went there and when I click on the different sites on the left, the links went to www.clickheretofind.com and it displayed everything besides Console Game Development. So what I am trying to say is that the site Hosted and Dev Links are misleading. So what systems do you think a beginner like me should develop one? EX: Nintendo, Sega Master System, Gameboy, etc.... Also, what developing tools do I need? EX: Assemblers, Visual C++, Borland C++ Builder, etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Whoa...

For starters, try learning simple Win32 programming, using DirectX as the starting kit; maybe even grab one of those DirectX wrappers (CDX was the best one, around DX 5; dunno how it is now) if you want quick results. Once you're familiar with coding and game design concepts, move up to other types of programming, like sound, multi-device input (keyboard/mouse, joystick).

Now, if you're serious about coding games, learn everything on your own. Read manuals and documentation. Buy games to dissect them and how they work (rather than solely for entertainment ). Try to write games that reflect what you want to accomplish, rather than what is currently the most popular on the market right now. Pick up starters books like the André Lamothe series (these are great for beginners).

For experience, practise-practise-practise. I've been reading and coding for a long time now (having only begun game programming in the last 3 years), and I'm only now nearing the beginning stages of a complete game. It takes perseverance, as well as a certain goal-driven mentality to be able to take anything to a higher level; game development is no different.

And as a side note, I would avoid console development entirely until you're familiar with general game programming. Those may require you to learn their particular GDKs or assembly languages (PSX anyone?) as well as learn how to optimize everything into kilobytes of code rather than the forgiving world of PCs with nearly unlimited resources. Not to mention that licensing might cost you thousands of dollars, and the fact that writing a GameBoy game (for example) isn't nearly as easily tested as a PC game.

As for tools, you will need a compiler. Get a student version of VC++ if you can (particularly for DirectX) or buy a regular copy (I think U.S. dollar prices range around 100$). Get a paint program for test-artwork (Paint Shop Pro is the best, no matter how hard someone flames you otherwise ). Get a good microphone for sounds (Windows Sound Recorder can do wonders for the price it is -- free).

Good luck!


MatrixCubed
http://MatrixCubed.org

Edited by - MatrixCubed on February 14, 2001 8:03:58 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
It''s back....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>as well as learn how to optimize everything into kilobytes of
>code rather than the forgiving world of PCs with nearly
>unlimited resources.
Yeah but if you''re just starting out in game programming, I doubt you''ll be at the stage of writing which will trouble the
storage capabilities of 90% of consoles.

>Not to mention that licensing might cost you thousands of
>dollars, and the fact that writing a GameBoy game (for example)
>isn''t nearly as easily tested as a PC game.
I find it pretty easy to test my GB games. Run the game through an emulator like No$Gb and you can look at any register/memory area whilst the thing is running.

I suppose that''s not much use unless you''re programming in assembler though.

But anyway, if you use an IDE you can type your code, click a button, have the code compiled, and see it running in the aforementioned emulator.

Piece of piss really.

I started with the Gameboy (for games programming) since I really couldn''t be bothered to faff around with DirectX. Handheld consoles also have the advantage that because of the lesser graphics capability - you don''t have to worry about your ugly artwork whilst you''re learning gameplay/physics fundamentals.

One thing I would add though, is that documentation/web-sites/tutorials/example code etc. is far more common for Windows game developers than console developers. If you''re going to need lots of help then it''d probably be better to go for the PC.

8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!