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LetsKillDave

June 2006 DirectX SDK is ready for download

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Sometime in the next 12 hours, the June 2006 DirectX SDK will be ready for downloading. There are a few changes, but the most important one is that the new version of Direct3D 10, which will work with the Beta 2 version of Windows Vista, is included. In addition, we have created a "Direct3D 10" discussion forum for all your Direct3D 10 questions here: http://forums.microsoft.com/MSDN/ShowForum.aspx?ForumID=785&SiteID=1 DirectX June 2006 (SDK) http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=1FD20DF1-DEC6-47D0-8BEF-10E266DFDAB8&displaylang=en DirectX June 2006 (Symbol Files) http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=2797EA7A-4A65-4CD2-8A73-18B28B386B48&displaylang=en [Edited by - jollyjeffers on June 8, 2006 9:24:41 PM]

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Hey :) Good news.
Does one have to own a DX10-capable video card to start playing with DX10 ? (yeah, I know there are none yet, but I just wanted to know if it was kinda emulated or something ?)

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Quote:
Original post by janta
Hey :) Good news.
Does one have to own a DX10-capable video card to start playing with DX10 ? (yeah, I know there are none yet, but I just wanted to know if it was kinda emulated or something ?)

Yes, you can use the reference device, just like you can in D3D9. If you are familiar with it, it is just a software rasterizer that implements all features of the API. It is very slow however, with framerates usually anywhere from 0.05fps to 2fps (depending on scene complexity).

Good to hear about the Beta 2 compatability...now to just install Vista [wink]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Koolchamp
This SDK work for Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition?


Yup. It always will :-)


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Quote:
Original post by mattnewport
The link for the symbols works for me but not the link for the SDK. Is it not up yet?


Yeah, where is it?!! Give me my SDK!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by deffer
Quote:
Original post by mattnewport
The link for the symbols works for me but not the link for the SDK. Is it not up yet?


Yeah, where is it?!! Give me my SDK!


*grumble* It appears the "landing page" isn't working yet. I'm NOT a happy camper. In the meantime, use this shortcut to go straight to the SDK goodies. It works, I checked :-)

http://download.microsoft.com/download/5/f/d/5fd259d5-b8a8-4781-b0ad-e93a9baebe70/dxsdk_jun2006.exe

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Original post by Spoonbender
Hmm, can you Microsoft people say whether there are plans to add support for the shader debugger in VS2k5 at some point in the future?


Shader debugging capabilities are being moved into the PIX tool to maintain consistency with Xbox 360 development. Shader debugging will NOT be integrated into Visual Studio 2005.

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That SoftParticle's sample sounds neat, but, the prerendered video of it is missing from the sdk, any chance of getting that included or posted up somewhere? I'd like to see how it looks running at a real frame rate. (being a particle junky myself) There's a link to it in the sample browser, so I know there's supposed to be a video of it.

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Am I the only one that doesn't feel like getting the latest SDK? I haven't really even started using shaders, let alone the extra fancy stuff that DirectX 10 adds.

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i have a question which mightbe quite a newbie one but i have never found an aswer to it. but i have somehow predicted it. what are "Symbol Files" used for? :S

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Symbol files provide some debugging information for the DirectX libraries. If you have the symbol files then when you break in the debugger inside some DirectX code you can see a callstack with the correct function names rather than just the addresses. This can be helpful in figuring out what the problem might be when something's not working the way you expect.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Could someone post what was added to the june 2006 SDK like new PIX features as the official SDK pages still only displayes the april changelist.

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
Could someone post what was added to the june 2006 SDK like new PIX features as the official SDK pages still only displayes the april changelist.


Quote:

Features Added in the June 2006 DirectX SDK Update

Direct3D 10 Technology Preview
The Direct3D 10 Technology Preview showcases the newest set of graphics API's for games and other high-performance multimedia applications on next-generation graphics hardware. This technology preview provides reference material, conceptual content, developer libraries, tutorials and samples that demonstrate how to use Direct3D 10. Additional content will provided in upcoming SDK releases.

Samples and applications built with the Direct3D 10 Technology Preview in the June 2006 DirectX SDK require Windows Vista Beta2 to run. The Windows Vista Beta2 will be available to MSDN subscribers.

Developers will notice that syntax has changed for several of the Direct3D 10 core API's between the Windows Vista February CTP and Windows Vista Beta2. Several API's have been added, renamed, or removed. For a full list of changes, see the June 2006: Overview of Direct3D 10 Header and Behavior Updates page in the Direct3D 10 documentation. All Direct3D 10 samples and tutorials have been updated in this SDK to reflect the new syntax. New samples have also been added in this release. Developers can expect a series of changes to arrive in subsequent SDK's.

For known limitations of this Technology Preview, refer to the Microsoft DirectX SDK ReadMe.

This documentation set is intended for developers using the C/C++ programming language.

HLSL Shader Compilation
Starting in the Direct3D10 February 2006 Tech Preview, a preview version of the new HLSL compiler targeting downlevel (Direct3D9) shader models was included. The compiler preview has been updated this SDK with a series of shader-code-generation improvements, as well as support for compiling Direct3D9 Effects files for use with the D3DX9 Effects system (fx_2_0 target).

Using FXC10 included in this SDK, you can try out the new compiler (with new language features such as Improved Flow Control Management) on Shader Model 3.0 and below. Keep in mind that not all HLSL optimizations and new features are active in this release. Generated shaders will not be fully optimized.

This new compiler will be integrated into D3DX9 in a future release. For issues relating to the compilation of shaders in the D3DX9 HLSL compiler, it is recommended that developers test their shaders through the new compiler where possible (via FXC10), and include the results when reporting issues to Microsoft.

Samples
New SoftParticles sample for Direct3D 10. SoftParticles augments various particle rendering techniques to avoid ugly particle vs geometry intersection artifacts by reading the depth buffer back as a texture and fading the particles out as they approach scene geometry.

The Direct3D 10 samples now use a custom binary mesh format (.sdkmesh) intended only for samples. Loader functions can be found in sdkmesh.h and sdkmesh.cpp. The meshconvert.exe tool can be used to convert from the .x format to the .sdkmesh format.

Debug Layer
Additional pipeline and parameter validation has been added to the Direct3D 10 Debug Layer.

PIX
PIX has been updated for June with the following major improvements and new features:

PIX introduces a new feature called pixel history. When investigating a single frame capture in PIX, you can select a pixel in a render target or surface and choose to debug the pixel. When this option is selected, everything that touched the pixel in the frame is displayed even if it fails a test like depth, alpha, or stencil. It shows the value of the pixel coming out of the pixel shader and the Framebuffer value for each primitive that affects the pixel. See Pixel History.
Realtime counters can now be displayed ontop of your game when you check the corresponding HUD checkbox is checked. This allows you to see in realtime what the counter values are as you play the game rather than just getting the report after the game is terminated. See HUD.
PIX supports the new Direct3D 10 APIs that are included in Windows Vista Beta2. PIX will no longer execute on pre-beta2 builds of Windows Vista.
You can now specify a pixrun file that contains full stream capture data as the target program in an experiment. When specified, PIX will replay the data in the pixrun file and perform the experiment on that stream. This was achievable prior to this release but it was difficult to setup.
You can now select event rows in the Events window and copy them to the clipboard. It is possible to select one or more rows from the Events window by using standard Windows conventions.
Microsoft Cross-Platform Audio Creation Tool (XACT)
XACT has been updated for June with the following major improvements:

The XACT GUI now allows for the import, export, and sharing of variables, categories, and presets across XACT projects. Multiple sound designers and composers can work on a single game and yet maintain their own XACT projects, sharing only those settings that are needed.
D3DX9
The D3DX9 library has not been updated in this release. The DLL is unchanged from the DirectX April 2006 SDK Release. Additional updates will be made in future releases.

For issues relating to the compilation of shaders in the D3DX9 HLSL compiler, it is recommended that developers test their shaders through the new compiler where possible (see HLSL Shader Compilation), and include the results when reporting issues to Microsoft.



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Quote:
Original post by Demirug
PIX introduces a new feature called pixel history. When investigating a single frame capture in PIX, you can select a pixel in a render target or surface and choose to debug the pixel. When this option is selected, everything that touched the pixel in the frame is displayed even if it fails a test like depth, alpha, or stencil. It shows the value of the pixel coming out of the pixel shader and the Framebuffer value for each primitive that affects the pixel. See Pixel History.


WOOOOOOO!

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Quote:
Original post by superpig
Quote:
Original post by Demirug
PIX introduces a new feature called pixel history. When investigating a single frame capture in PIX, you can select a pixel in a render target or surface and choose to debug the pixel. When this option is selected, everything that touched the pixel in the frame is displayed even if it fails a test like depth, alpha, or stencil. It shows the value of the pixel coming out of the pixel shader and the Framebuffer value for each primitive that affects the pixel. See Pixel History.


WOOOOOOO!


Hey, you were telling me way back that a similar system is used for PIX for Xbox. Is that really the same thing?!

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Quote:
Original post by Cypher19
Quote:
Original post by superpig
Quote:
Original post by Demirug
PIX introduces a new feature called pixel history. When investigating a single frame capture in PIX, you can select a pixel in a render target or surface and choose to debug the pixel. When this option is selected, everything that touched the pixel in the frame is displayed even if it fails a test like depth, alpha, or stencil. It shows the value of the pixel coming out of the pixel shader and the Framebuffer value for each primitive that affects the pixel. See Pixel History.


WOOOOOOO!


Hey, you were telling me way back that a similar system is used for PIX for Xbox. Is that really the same thing?!


It is the very same indeedy :-)

I'm going to cover a quick demo of it on my blog shortly, once I get past some annoying network problems.

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At last! Just finished downloading Vista Beta2 and DXSDK June (almost 3.5GB total download). Now I have to install everything.

Now, I know that the answer will probably be NO but I still have to ask. As the main Vista GUI is built over DX9, will I still be able to program my DX9 engine using Vista + DX9SDK + Visual Studio Express 2005 + Platform SDK? Or should I start moving it to DX10 and .Net?

Luck!
Guimo



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You can develop D3D9 apps on vista but I recommend keeping a XP as dual boot because the D3D9 drivers are still in beta too.

The primary API for D3D10 is unmanaged. To be more exact the current beta doesn’t even contain a managed version. I currently update my own managed layer for D3D10 to the changes in beta 2.

Before you start with D3D10 you should make sure that you understand the consequences of such a step.

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