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Language Theories

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I was wondering if anyone knew of any interesting articles about unique approaches to programming langauges (as in new/fictional ones, not C++ and the like). I've ran across a few in the past, but that was years ago. And to be more specific, I am talking about the design of the language. Thanks in advanced!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
I was wondering if anyone knew of any interesting articles about unique approaches to programming langauges (as in new/fictional ones, not C++ and the like).


There are many approaches to programming that are VERY unlike C++ and the like, yet are neither new nor fictional.

See, for example, functional programming. Check out Haskell and Scheme and ML.

Or logic programming. Check out Prolog.

For newer stuff check out term rewriting systems such as Maude.

For cool stuff in general about languages and their design, check out:

http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/

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Yeah I guess specifics help.. I'm looking into high-readability languages that are flexable (like python), that are also highly object oriented.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I can't say I know much about these, as I believe OO is generally overhyped. A lot of python's strengths are due to other features, I believe.

Smalltalk should be mentioned as the canonical completely OO language, but I guess you already know about it.

You might look into Common Lisps' object system, CLOS. Instead of restricting methods to being owned by classes, it has generic methods that are dispatched on multiple argument types. It's a different (more flexible in my opinion) approach to OO.

Then again, I don't think you'd call Lisp high-readability, so i'm sorry I couldn't be more helpful.

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I don't know of a discussion of design, but I'm a big fan of LabVIEW which is a pretty big switch from C++.

Another thing I find interesting is some of what's happening with Squeak. The Etoys in particular.

Whether you consider these OO is probably a matter of definitions. No two people seem to have the same definition for OOP. When you say you want OO, what are you looking for?

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I've been playing with Ruby lately and it is surprising what you can do with it. I don't see it replacing C++ for making games with, but it is a nice change to work with.

~Shiny.

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If this kind of stuff interests you, you might have some fun following the Epoch Language, which is currently in the early design phases, and actually started right here on GDNet.

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Indeed, take a look at Haskell! You need to be determined to learn it, most people coming from a background of imperative languages hate it for a couple of weeks before they "get it" - and then they love it.

Another cool thing you should look at is Jekyll.
http://jekyllc.sourceforge.net/index.html

It's a new high level Haskell like language, BUT it can be translated to C and back so your legacy code (and legacy programmers) can use C, while new code (and smart programmers) can use a modern language.
It's alpha right now, but it seems like a good compromise. I'd rather everyone just stopped using C and switch to something better (i.e. *anything*), but that may not happen anytime soon so something like Jekyll could be a good enough compromise.

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Well a friend and I have been working on a modular game system (actuially been going on for about 3 years now), and I am planning on either writing my own scripting language, or writing a parcer for an existing one ( I've written a BASIC and ASM parcer so at least the concepts aren't foreign). I like the way BYOND's language kindof melds with the system, but I want something a little less pythony. Even though it'l be parsed I'll still need the ability to debug/step through code (Which is why I figured i'd just write my own parcer). Thank you for your ideas, and I'll look over them and see what I can pick up!

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