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Zekeva

Game engines

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Hi. I'm new to the community though I've been lurking for a bit and have read a number of the articles on the website. I am a CS student in New Zealand and I plan to work in the game industry when I complete my masters degree in a couple of years. As a lot of you will know, university gives you a good grounding in both the math and the methologies and thought-processes in CS but it still leaves a lot to the imagination in the specialized fields like game development. So I came to this site and got to reading. Now I'm rambling...so my question is this: I read the enginuity series of tutorials and worked through some of the code. I noted from the outset that these articles were written in 2003. I wanted to know if this is still the general architecture that a generic game engine would still take on. Do the game engines that are being built today have a similar underlying structure? Looking around the place I find the key subsystems are still very much the same but I wanted to get some feedback from those in the know. Cheers.

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Enginuity is a good start for any game engine. It covers stuff that will be important to any type of engine, such as logging, kernel/task implementation, and memory management. Of course, for people like me, a lot mor info is required. I recommend looking at existing code bases (like ogre and irrlicht for a rendering engine) and try to see how they put it together. The biggest issue for me when writing an engine is starting with a good design.

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Hey Zekeva,

I'm in a similar position now, and I'm following the groundwork of the Enginuity articles loosely. My opinion is that it's a pretty solid framework, at least in the kernel area, since it encapsulates functionality every engine is going to need at its core. I can recommend a book: 3D Game Engine Architecture, which is sort of my Bible on engine design. It's not easy reading, but it goes into great detail of what the Wild Magic engine has going on underneath the hood with good explanation (not much of a tutorial though; basically explains just what, and why that technique was used).

My view is that the foundation structure will almost always be the same as time goes on (barring some major change in gameplay or hardware), but we'll add new parts to the structure. Take this with a grain of salt, however; I'm a hobbyist and not in the industry.

Hope that helps,
Aviosity

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