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Aardvajk

Making the jump to DirectX 9

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I am now but days away from finally having broadband at home (at work at the moment) and so would like to finally throw off DirectDraw and DirectX 7 and join the modern world of Direct3D and DirectX 9. Could someone give me some pointers on the best way to do this. I appreciate I need to download the SDK from Microsoft, but I still have 98SE at home so can't use Visual C++ Express compiler and IDE (the free one). I currently use Borland's free compiler (BCC55) for any DirectX stuff I do. I understand I can run implib on dlls to create an up-to-date import library but what about the headers? Can I just use the ones that ship with the SDK with Borland? I'm a big fan of the digital mars compiler but have never managed to get DirectX working with this, despite the well-intentioned but rather confusing advice offered by the people on the dm forums. Or would I be better to download just the free Microsoft C++ compiler? I assume this will work okay with 98SE. I'm sure others here have been through this process before and would appreciate the benefit of any experiences and advice anyone can give me. Contrary to popular opinion, I'm not a total moron so even just some good links would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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Unfortunately, Microsoft seems to have removed the free Visual C++ 2003 Toolkit Compiler. This was the only free Microsoft compiler toolkit I know of, that works with the DirectX SDK and runs under Windows 98SE...

The DirectX headers should work fine with the Borland compiler, btw.
Alternatively you can use the Code::Blocks IDE and use the Toolkit compiler (unofficial mirror - verified by me) [wink] following the directions here.

Good luck!
Pat.
[edit]Found a faster download server for the VC++ 2k3 toolkit compiler.[/edit]

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Thanks a lot darookie. I think I'll try with Borland first since I already know where I am with that, but if that doesn't work I'll have a look at the links you have supplied.

With Borland, am I right in assuming that if I run Borland's implib on the dlls supplied with the SDK to create Borland-compatible links, then point the Borland lib and include paths at the correct SDK locations, I'll be up and running (in theory at least)?

I assume also that I WON'T be able to compile all the examples that come with the SDK. The documentation should still be accessible though, no?

Thinking about it, perhaps I would be better with the Microsoft Toolkit. Is that mirror like an old version of the compiler they used to give away on their site?

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Quote:
Original post by EasilyConfused
Thanks a lot darookie.

You're welcome [smile]
Quote:

Is that mirror like an old version of the compiler they used to give away on their site?

Yes, it points to the installation file of the Visual C++ 2003 Toolkit Compiler, which essentially is the VC++ 7.1 compiler toolchain that shipped with the Visual C++ Professional edition and was given away for free by Microsoft.
Since Microsoft ended end-user support for Windows 98SE and Windows 2000, the link was removed basically forcing developers to Windows XP (the Express-editions only work on Windows 2000 and later).

Cheers,
Pat

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Sorry to bump this.

Just downloaded the C++ Toolkit as above and it won't install on 98SE. Wants 2000 at the least. Is there any way at all to get this compiler working on 98?

Also, I'm assuming that if I try to download the SDK the same thing is going to happen. Is this correct, before I waste my time? Is there any way to get a DirectX 9 SDK up and running on a 98 machine these days?

Quite annoying since I am quite sure this is an unnecessary restriction to force us all to move to 2000 or later.

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I know that some companies have forced migration from one platform to another, and sometimes for dubious reasons.

However, given that Windows 98 has its roots in MS-DOS, and Win2k/XP have their roots in Windows NT, I'd be a bit reluctant to write this off as superfluous. Btw, at this point, MS is strongly discouraging targeting Win2k.

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Well, I appreciate there is a major difference between the two but the Toolkit compiler used to work under 98 and DirectX 9 SDK used to as well. I know Microsoft have withdrawn support for 98 now but does this mean that I can't get hold of older versions of the compiler and the SDK from ANYWHERE?

Guess I'm going to have to upgrade to 2000, but then a load of my games won't work. Dual-boot system ahoy, then.

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