• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Warcraft style terrain tutorial

This topic is 4256 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Can anyone enlighten me on where to find discussions/books/tutorials about storing/retrieving/rendering a large world terrain (like world of warcraft), instead of small height maps? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Although I dont know for sure how they do it in world of warcraft I imagine it goes something like this. At the base level each region will be defined by a height map and maybe several other maps which determine things like terrain type and vegitation. Since the game terrains are very big and there's many of them, these maps will be low resolution and are only there to allow the artists to define the placement of large scale terrain features such as the mountains, rivers, forests, etc. The fine detail will then be added in proceduraly at run time using a repeatable psuedo random generator based around some kind of perlin noise function most likely. They likey use a CLOD method for the actual terrain rendering too. I dont have any good links to hand right now but if you do a google for things such as 'procedural terrain generation' and 'CLOD' you'll find plenty floating around out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting.. but there are no forests. And most mountains are navigable, at least partially, until gravity sim sets in. I've searched on CLOD before, but I'll definitely google 'procedural terrain generation'.

The dungeon info is interesting albeit to high level for what I need. And the 'Gos' are throwing me. It does verify a few thoughts.

Thanks for the inputs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Designing for CLOD is probably only relevant if you're targeting older hardware. With newer GPUs, it's a ton easier to just have near terrain be well tesselated, and use a clip-map type approach to degrade polygon count for the terrain as it gets further away.

There's been discussion of this here on GameDev, and there's a link to some of the Microsoft research papers on the subject here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement