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the Best Lanuage???

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hey every1 ... im a beginner n dont know much about gamez programming rite now. i wanted to knw which is the lanuage used to write game programs?? what i have found out till now is that C/C++ is quite popular but im a lil confused here... is C/C++ used for ps2 games with such high quality graphics as well...??? also, which would be the best lanuage for me to learn .. so that i can work on it n go on to write programs in it..and is visual C++ used more these days or is C/C++ the best lanuage for games programming for PS2 and other consoles with high quality graphics..

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There is no best language. I personally use a C++ core with gamecode written in Python in my next title.

C/C++ is the most popular language in industry. It is used to develop PS2 games, but it is not all you need to develop PS2 games (you will need an official contract and development kit from Sony, which requires you to be an established game development company with office space, a publisher, and assured financial flow). This holds true for all current consoles.

Visual C++ is an editor for C++. It is not a different language.

Last, I'm moving this to For Beginners.

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The majority of current commercial computer games are written in a combination of languages. The core engine might be written in C or C++ with some routines done in assembly with some sort of scripting language such as Lua or Python to create elements of the actual game.

As for learning, if you don't already know how to program I would suggest starting with a relatively easier language like Python or C#.

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Quote:
Original post by ahsas
which would be the best lanuage for me to learn ..


English, and then either VB.Net or C#.

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Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
Quote:
Original post by ahsas
which would be the best lanuage for me to learn ..


English,

Please. I've seen people here from Canada, the US, and England use far worse grammatical constructs than this person. Don't be a snob.
Quote:
and then either VB.Net or C#.

Now that's just plain mean [smile]

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Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
English,[..]

Please. I've seen people here from Canada, the US, and England use far worse grammatical constructs than this person. Don't be a snob.


I suppose your right, and I guess I've forgotten this is the beginners forum.


Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
and then either VB.Net or C#.

Now that's just plain mean [smile]


Do you have something against those languages?

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Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
English,[..]

Please. I've seen people here from Canada, the US, and England use far worse grammatical constructs than this person. Don't be a snob.


I suppose your right, and I guess I've forgotten this is the beginners forum.


Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
and then either VB.Net or C#.

Now that's just plain mean [smile]


Do you have something against those languages?

No. [grin] In all seriousness, when someone is learning about programming for the first time, IMHO, I wouldn't suggest C# or VB.Net. I mean if you click on the form it's just code everywhere and no intuitive way to discern the information. If a VM'd language is to be used, I would use Java. Technically C#, Java, and VB.net are pretty much the same thing. But normally with Java, you download a compiler and start programming from scratch. With C# and Java, you start, normally, with the Forms. Yes, I know you can code from scratch. I'm just talking about the normal first approach to both languages.

I know I just jumbled something up. Sorry. Hopefully I got some part of my point across.

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Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
English,[..]

Please. I've seen people here from Canada, the US, and England use far worse grammatical constructs than this person. Don't be a snob.


I suppose your right, and I guess I've forgotten this is the beginners forum.


Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Thevenin
and then either VB.Net or C#.

Now that's just plain mean [smile]


Do you have something against those languages?
With C# and Java, you start, normally, with the Forms.


A little bit of a semantic error there, don't you think?

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If you need on lang to do everything C++. More 3rd party libs than any other lang.

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Original post by BlueHabu
If you need on lang to do everything C++. More 3rd party libs than any other lang.


Quote:
C++ all the way, with OpenGL for graphics and OpenAL for audio.


What other languages have you tried? If you have tried 3 or more languages, why do you say C++?

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I would recommened against starting with C++ or even C; both are incredibly complex languages. If you do decide to start with either of those, you'll be doing more memorization than actual learning, as most C++ concepts are too advanced for a beginner programmer to understand (trust me, I started with C myself). I would recommened starting with Python. It's a very simple language that allows you to write programs quickly without worrying about low-level C constructs. If you want to write games with Python, look into the PyGame library.

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In my opinion, I would suggest BlitzBasic. Its pretty easy to learn and you can make some rad games with it, as well as other programs for other purposes. Im starting to teach my little sister whos in the 7th grade to program in BlitzBasic, so its not as complicated as someother languages, which is good for your first programming language. Check it out here.

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Neither C++ or C is a complicated language in the least. There is very little memorization involved at all. First of all, the basic syntax of C++ is also shared by Java and C# (both of which are amazingly more complex in usage than either C or C++). Logically, the syntax wouldn't have spread as far if it were as hard to use as you say. Besides that, both C and C++ are based on a few simple statements (noteably: for, do, while, and if). C++ has classes, which are significantly more complicated but they are in basically all languages which have them. There is also a simple matter of explicit typecasting, which can be learned in about 5 minutes. The hardest part of learning either languge is the process of learning the library functions (for which documentation is avalable in many hundreds of forms online).

[[EDIT]] I should also note that most languages in common useage today were heavily influenced by C or C++ when they were being developed. (note: i said most, not all)

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Visual basic is easy and is a good start, not too easy and not too hard, at first. I think it would get you prepared to move onto other things, and even then you dont have too because VB can actually do alot of things!!!
Unless you really want to dive deep into programming, just by moving an image across a form in VB is really easy.

[source lang = "vb"]

do

image.x = image.x + 1

a = a + 1

loop while a < 10




and you dont have to initalize all the video and window FUN STUFF like C and higher coding languages..

But i guess it really doesnt matter unless your a 5 year old, if you can read and have reached your comprehendable age in life, you can grab any language with a book and some help!!!

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Look, everyone is just going to keep suggesting whatever language they think is "the best", because if they didn't think that they wouldn't be using it.

Rather than choosing a language based on the opinions of faceless Internet users, I would suggest you try out a few of the major languages(most have alrady been mentioned) and then pick the one you think is "the best". You can get free compilers and editors for any language(or at least a demo for blitz).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You can start with C++, but in this case you really have to start with a good C++ book. http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/

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Quote:
Original post by Kevinator
Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
With C# and Java, you start, normally, with the Forms.


A little bit of a semantic error there, don't you think?

Really where?

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Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
Original post by Kevinator
Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
With C# and Java, you start, normally, with the Forms.


A little bit of a semantic error there, don't you think?

Really where?


Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
But normally with Java, you download a compiler and start programming from scratch. With C# and Java, you start, normally, with the Forms.


I think you meant "C# and VB". Anyway I think you're wrong, I haven't used the form designer once. The code is spits out is a mess, I see no real reason to use it for anything other than a purely GUI application.

[Edited by - Scet on July 3, 2006 2:35:43 PM]

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Original post by medevilenemy
Neither C++ or C is a complicated language in the least. There is very little memorization involved at all. First of all, the basic syntax of C++ is also shared by Java and C# (both of which are amazingly more complex in usage than either C or C++). Logically, the syntax wouldn't have spread as far if it were as hard to use as you say. Besides that, both C and C++ are based on a few simple statements (noteably: for, do, while, and if). C++ has classes, which are significantly more complicated but they are in basically all languages which have them. There is also a simple matter of explicit typecasting, which can be learned in about 5 minutes. The hardest part of learning either languge is the process of learning the library functions (for which documentation is avalable in many hundreds of forms online).

Learning a language is much more than just learning the syntax and the functions in the standard library. For example, in C and C++ you also have to deal with pointer correctness and explicit memory management. In C++ you need to worry about exception safety, Koenig lookup problems, all sorts of template idiocy, accidental creation of unnecessary temporaries and so on.

It's easy to write bad C or C++ code, it's hard to write even mediocre C++ code; a condition exacerbated by the number of ignorant, but well meaning authors who post "tutorials" on the internet that promote various bad programming habits just because they think that finally figuring out pointers somehow makes them experts in the field.

And, of course, the fact of the matter is that despite your claims, C++ syntax is hard. Compare how many threads we get with posters asking why their code won't even compile in C++ compared to any number of other languages. We have quite a few C# users here, and most of them don't need help with syntax twice a week. Instead they ask questions about algorithms or rendering techniques. Just because other languages have similar syntax doesn't mean they have similar syntactic difficulties. For the most part, languages that use C or C++ like syntax use a simplified version of the syntax* that make things much easier to learn and get right.


* the obvious exceptions being Managed C++ and C++/CLI

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Somebody needs to create some minor varient of an existing language and call it "Best". Then we'd have an answer to this question.

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Oh, brother...
[bangs head against wall]
...not another one of these.

Anyway, you should probably start with Java just to get the idea of programming. Then move to C then to C++. If you do that, you will already know C# and VB for all practical purposes, so it's just a matter of relating what you know of Java to the .NET framework, which is the C#/VB.NET analog of the Java libraries.

And then, just to keep the flamebait tradition alive, you should start a thread called "Why does C++ suck so bad?". [grin]

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Original post by medevilenemy
Neither C++ or C is a complicated language in the least. There is very little memorization involved at all. First of all, the basic syntax of C++ is also shared by Java and C# (both of which are amazingly more complex in usage than either C or C++).


This is a rather strange notion of 'complexity' being used here. :/

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