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Next programming language

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I already know: - C and CPP - BASIC - x86 Assembly - a little Ada For the purpose of game developing and other forms of programming, what languages should I consider to learn next? I have heard that 80% of all programming code is COBOL, but I don't know if it would be worth learning. Any suggestions?

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If you're mainly interested in games development COBOL is entirely useless. For games you might want to take a look at C#, lua or Python.

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It certainly wouldn't hurt to have some knowledge of COBOL since a lot of businesses still have lots of COBOL code that needs maintainance or perhaps even porting to a more modern languages. So if your interested in that type of work then sure. As a previous poster mentioned, .Net languages are getting quite a bit of use or perhaps even Java.

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Hello world in COBOL:


000100 IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
000200 PROGRAM-ID. HELLOWORLD.
000300
000400*
000500 ENVIRONMENT DIVISION.
000600 CONFIGURATION SECTION.
000700 SOURCE-COMPUTER. RM-COBOL.
000800 OBJECT-COMPUTER. RM-COBOL.
000900
001000 DATA DIVISION.
001100 FILE SECTION.
001200
100000 PROCEDURE DIVISION.
100100
100200 MAIN-LOGIC SECTION.
100300 BEGIN.
100400 DISPLAY " " LINE 1 POSITION 1 ERASE EOS.
100500 DISPLAY "Hello world!" LINE 15 POSITION 10.
100600 STOP RUN.
100700 MAIN-LOGIC-EXIT.
100800 EXIT.


It makes me want to cry.

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if you want to get a job programming games, forget COBOL.
if you want to get a job programming other stuff, forget COBOL.

There are plenty of guys out there with decades of COBOL experience that can't get work. Companies aren't gonna hire a junior programmer when they can get a senior engineer for the same price.

Python is a good language to know (google uses it)

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Quote:
Original post by Cornflake420
I have heard that 80% of all programming code is COBOL, but I don't know if it would be worth learning.


Likely because COBOL is so long-winded. However, I'd recommend you become familiar with a language which is up-and-coming, such as Python or Ruby - both are very good for cutting through boilerplate coding, and have growing followings and public codebases. However, pay more attention than the others than me if you're interested in 100% game programming; my knowledge of the field is more limited than theirs. Also, lua is not only a great scripting language, but also fairly powerful as a stand-alone language, or GUI language (FLTK-lua, etc.), so my vote goes for it as well.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I would suggest Java because you can use it also for getting a job, it's widely used.

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My recommendations, in order of importance:

1. A Lisp dialect or an ML dialect such as OCaml
2. Ruby
3. C#
4. Java


Learning a functional language will change the way you think about programming, introduce you to a lot of extremely important techniques and tools, and make you a better coder in general. The sooner you pick up and become fluent in a functional language, the better your programming will be.

I place Ruby second because you'll be able to really appreciate it after coming from functional languages - it has many functional-style features and capabilities, but can still be treated like an imperative language. It's also far more elegant than Python in many ways.

Third, C# is becoming very large in tools development, GUI apps, and even web development (in certain sectors). C# will be familiar to you from C/C++, and some of the more interesting features (especially those in the upcoming C# 3.0) will be of great benefit to you after some solid background in functional programming. It's also going to be increasingly important to be competent with the .Net platform in the coming years, and C# is as good a way as any to get used to it.

Finally, once you're comfortable with C#, making the leap to Java will be a breeze - Java is very deeply entrenched in web and business programming, and you'll need to know if eventually if you're interested in working in those sectors.

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I second the suggestion for Ruby. I went from C to C++ to Java and now to Ruby, and I love it. Learning as many languages as possible is a Good Thing (tm). Ruby and Python are definitely worth knowing, even if you never use them in your work experience -- just knowing them expands your knowledge and technique.

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.NET is a Microsoft library which is common between its currently supported languages.

I suggest learning Java (just because everyone knows Java and there's good support for it online). After that, if you want an extremely powerful scripting language, try Python.

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If you are familiar with C and C++, Java will be very easy for you. I learned Java after C and it was so very simple for me because the syntax and a lot of the constructs in the languages are very similar.

Personally I'm heading down the path of C# shortly as well. Probably not for actual game development (I'm a faithful supporter of C++ for that) but as someone said above, it is very nice for tool development.

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