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goatboy413

I've been reading the threads. Need newbie help

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I've read the FAQs twice and I've even read the new member section. I've been reading people's post about programming and where to begin and what not. However I'm still confused where to start at. See I've never done any sort of programming whatsoever. I just have a lot of free time on my hands and I love games. Games are a big part of my life so I've taken an interest in modding and would like to learn programming. I think I'm going to start with C++ but I have a question. Is there anything else I should learn besides C++? I've only use my computer to run programs, play games, and do my daily task on it. So I basically don't have in depth knowledge of everything. But I want nothing more then to start programming. So could anybody tell me where to begin? Should I quit now because I'm too far over my head? (I THINK NOT!) Any help would be appreciated. thanks

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Well since you have plenty of free time I would suggest C++ or Python. Most of the coding vets (and most mods) will suggest Python. The only reason I suggest C++ is because there's a workshop going on right now teaching C++ (it's called CPP Workshop; it's in the forums).

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If you have no experience with programming, I wouldn't recommend starting with C++. You might want to first try something like GameMaker which will let you start making simple games without too much programming. If you really want to dive in with the programming end of things, I would recommend an easier language liky Python or C#.

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Quote:

From Teach Yourself Programming In Ten Years
Several people have asked what programming language they should learn first. There is no one answer, but consider these points:

  • Use your friends. When asked "what operating system should I use, Windows, Unix, or Mac?", my answer is usually: "use whatever your friends use." The advantage you get from learning from your friends will offset any intrinsic difference between OS, or between programming languages. Also consider your future friends: the community of programmers that you will be a part of if you continue. Does your chosen language have a large growing community or a small dying one? Are there books, web sites, and online forums to get answers from? Do you like the people in those forums?

  • Keep it simple. Programming languages such as C++ and Java are designed for professional development by large teams of experienced programmers who are concerned about the run-time efficiency of their code. As a result, these languages have complicated parts designed for these circumstances. You're concerned with learning to program. You don't need that complication. You want a language that was designed to be easy to learn and remember by a single new programmer.

  • Play. Which way would you rather lern to play the piano: the normal, interactive way, in which you hear each note as soon as you hit a key, or "batch" mode, in which you only hear the notes after you finish a whole song? Clearly, interactive mode makes learning easier for the piano, and also for programming. Insist on a language with an interactive mode and use it.



Given these criteria, my recommendations for a first programming language would be Python or Scheme. But your circumstances may vary, and there are other good choices. If your age is a single-digit, you might prefer Alice or Squeak (older learners might also enjoy these). The important thing is that you choose and get started.


HTH.

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Quote:
Original post by SiCrane
If you have no experience with programming, I wouldn't recommend starting with C++. You might want to first try something like GameMaker which will let you start making simple games without too much programming. If you really want to dive in with the programming end of things, I would recommend an easier language liky Python or C#.


I must back SiCrane on the GameMaker comment (haven't used Python or C#): GM can be used to develop a good sense of procedural programming (but it lacks some in OOP).

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First off I want to say thanks for the input. As soon as I started getting replies I went ahead and downloaded GM. Its a fun plain system. I tried to create games on my own but it was a little hard to get my character to spawn. Everything else worked fine but I didn't have a character. So in the end I just edited one of the other games to create my own game.

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Yes, it is. Python is an excellent language for beginners. It's fairly simple, yet has a ton of power. Also, it is fairly popular as a scripting language for games. Civilization 4 used it for scripting.

I *highly* recommend Python.

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Quote:
Original post by Ezbez
Also, it is fairly popular as a scripting language for games. Civilization 4 used it for scripting.


Civilization 4 used it for pretty much everything except the AI and the 3D engine, which are in C++. They used boost::python to expose the AI and graphics routines to the python code.

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I agree any C-based language is good (c++ in my opinion) and definately Python.

However, what everybody has been neglecting to mention is the other side of games. IE the following:

Game Design:

Most people say they can do this, but it is nice to practice. If you want to improve this part, I suggest Game Maker, least amount of programming needed to get the feel and idea of a game.

Game Graphics:

If you feel you are atistic you might want to get your hands on some graphics software. (IE Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro, (Theres a free one I can't remember) etc)

Or try 3D modelling. (IE 3D Studio Max, Blender, etc)

Game Audio:

If you feel that you can create music you can look at some music software. (Lots of software available)

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