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I find myself missing out on a lot of employment potential because of my unfamiliarity with Unreal technologies (which sadly don't include Unreal tournament[: 2003|: 2004]). So I'm out to fix that. A google search yielded a link to the UnrealWiki, does anyone know of any other good resources (assuming the UnrealWiki is indeed a good resource, I haven't started reading it yet) to become familiar with the Unreal Engine? Perhaps there's a free SDK or some documentation I am unaware of? Also, the latest version is 3.0. I would imagine that's where I should focus my interest, but would it behoove me to start with an earlier version for whatever reason? Thanks!

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Original post by Asrai
You could try this I believe the title says it all...


From amazaon.com: "Mastering Unreal Technology: The Art of Level Design knows no boundaries as it shows you how to build custom mods, maps and levels with the Unreal engine."

It looks to me like that book really just focuses on the unreal editor, and making maps etc with it. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the OP is looking more to familiarize himself with Unreal Engine, not Unreal Editor.

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Here is info about Unreal Engine 2, which leads to a free evaluation version. You would have to buy a license to fully use it.
The Unreal Engine 3 is said to cost over $700,000. I'm not sure if that's developing it or aquiring it.

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I actually purchased that book and found that the companion CD that carried all of the static meshes and textures didn't work so it was near impossible to follow the tutorials in the book. However it still provided some great info.

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Thanks for the book suggestion. I was hoping for a free online resource, though, as I don't have a lot of money for a book.

Quote:

Here is info about Unreal Engine 2, which leads to a free evaluation version. You would have to buy a license to fully use it.


Is UE2 a prelude to UE3? In other words, is it like DX8 compared to DX9, or are they completely different versions, and if I want to be able to use UE3, studying UE2 will get me no where?

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Original post by CyberSlag5k
Is UE2 a prelude to UE3? In other words, is it like DX8 compared to DX9, or are they completely different versions, and if I want to be able to use UE3, studying UE2 will get me no where?


A lot of current FPS's use Unreal. UE3 is the next generation version of the engine for PC/PS3/360. Studying UE2 should help you understand UE3 once it comes out publicly.

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Original post by CyberSlag5k
Is UE2 a prelude to UE3? In other words, is it like DX8 compared to DX9, or are they completely different versions, and if I want to be able to use UE3, studying UE2 will get me no where?


Here's Epic's Unreal Technology Roadmap that explains each of their engines.

You can also get more info about the UnrealEngine2 Runtime (which is licensed for non-commercial and educational use only). Here's information about using the runtime.

If you want to use something other than the UE2 runtime, here is the licensing info.

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Original post by CyberSlag5k
Quote:
Original post by Ravuya
Ah, I guess you picked choice C in your journal entry. Best of luck.


I'm a bit confused... or is this not meant for me?

I notice now that you indeed do not have a journal. I read a journal yesterday or the day before that I remember your avatar from, wondering if they should work on a current-gen project, next-gen product, or quit.

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UE3 has some significant changes from UE2, and it's still a work in progress. However, getting familiar with UE2 will help get your feet wet, and while being familiar with UE2 won't be as much of a resume helper as UE3 experience would be, it will help.

It's worth noting that, overall, most companies that license Unreal make significant changes to it, so don't go into a job expecting to see the "stock" version of the engine.

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