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Where can I find a good tutorial on mutexes?

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Sorry to have to bring the question here, but I've searched all over the internet and can't seem to find one. My problem is that I have many instances of a certain classes, that all interact with each other's members. Namely a char*. Problem is, they're all multi-threaded and running individually and I don't want 2 instances editting another at the same time. So, I figured... find a way to freeze everything trying to edit this instance until whatever's already editing it is finished. I'm currently using process.h (with teh _beginthread()) for my multi-threading if that makes any difference. So if at all possible, I'd really appreciate a simple tutorial (possibly) including functions to use (developing for W98SE) and basic theory on mutexes. Thank you very much! --Aternus

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a mutex is just an object that is either signaled or unsignaled. in windows you use the function CreateMutex to create a mutex. example:


class Monitor {
private :
HANDLE mutex;
public :
Monitor()
{
mutex = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL); // not signaled
}
~Monitor()
{
CloseHandle(mutex);
mutex = 0;
}
};





so now say you want to protect a variable from being accessed at the same time by different threads... check out the function SetValue below...


class Monitor {
private :
HANDLE mutex;
int value; // need to protect
public :
Monitor()
{
mutex = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL); // not signaled
}
~Monitor()
{
CloseHandle(mutex);
mutex = 0;
}
public :
void SetValue(int v)
{
// the region between WaitForSingleObject and ReleaseMutex is
// called a critical section as only one thread at a time can
// be there so you don't have to worry about concurrent access
WaitForSingleObject(mutex, INFINITE); // wait for ownership
// mutex is now signaled
value = v; // set value
ReleaseMutex(mutex); // release ownership
// mutex is now unsignaled
}
void GetValue(int& v)
{
WaitForSingleObject(mutex, INFINITE); // wait for ownership
v = value; // read value in critical section
ReleaseMutex(mutex); // release ownership
}
};





this is a real simple example of a monitor however... if you have certain conditions that must be met before you can set or read a value you'll need other syncronization objects as well.

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