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stenny

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aye, I've been composing music ever since I started gaming. Grand games, like Final fantasy VIII or chrono trigger started to get me interested into composing and I've been composing ever since (more actively in the last couple of years). I started out with just stuffing chords after each other on my keyboard (I was actually quite proud of my C|G|am|FG| progression[grin]) and playing other pieces. After some years I found out you could also compose music on computers[grin], and I started out with Anvil Studio, and started Guitar playing. In about a month or two I switched to guitar pro (don't know if anyone knows GP (Guitar Pro) to create simple midi's. I'm a programmer too, and midi's are way smaller). Now, I'd like to get proffesional. Well...At least further than midi level. After surviving some time on this forums I've heard terms like samples and mastering without even knowing what they are (yes yes, you may laught at me[smile]). I wouldn'd mind investing money in it, even if that means getting a job to get enough money (I know programs are extremely expensive), but my main concern is: Where to start? Hope you guys can help. -Stenny [Edited by - stenny on July 23, 2006 5:22:18 AM]

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I would buy a sequencer like sonar, FL studio, or cubase. And play with it for hours, weeks, months, years until you learn all the ins and out...or you could read the manual but where is the fun in that : ) The benefit of a sequencer is that it will be able to more or less do everything in one location. You can record live instruments, add effects, record midi instruments, manually enter notation, insert synth instrument plugins, etc, etc, etc. This is how I got started....well I suppose technically I had finale first and would score out my rock bands songs for fun and then got sonar. Other than that money becomes an issue (buying studio monitors, nice microphone, high end computer, etc.) but if you buy a low end version of one of the above mentioned sequencers they arent to spendy. Hope this helped.

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It did certainly help. So you're saying the first best step would be buying a...what was it called...*scrolling back*.....sequencer and experimenting the hell out of it?

-Stenny

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Maybe its the student in me, but I'd also check out some books on the subject. Aaron Mark's books "The Complete Guide to Game Audio" and the Fatman's (George Sanger)book on Game Audio are two good places to start.

There are many other books, articles and forums (like this one) that can help you out. I'd also look into Computer Music, a monthly publication from the UK. This magazine is great b/c they rate all of the new software, give you demos and free samples to mess around with. There is also an extensive Q&A coverage in each issue.

Another thing I'd do is check out www.acidplanet.com

This is where I started my electronic music career- and it was a great proving ground. I was able to get my music out to a ton of people and get feedback. I was also about to take part in collabs from musicians all over the world. If you want a place to try your music out- that would be the spot. My only warning is some people on there only give out positive reviews instead of actually being critical b/c they're hoping to get the same back. There are plenty of musicians on there that will give you honest assessments of your music, mix and helpful advice.

I'm also more than willing to always lend an ear and help you out with anything you need. I'm not God's gift to audio- but I've been involved in 18 projects and seem to have some knack for this crazy business!!! :)

Hope this helps,

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yeah thats what I would reccomend....reading a book can be helpful when learning to do specific things (like composing for games) but just learning how to write music on a computer period is a big topic and I dont have the patience to read on how to do it though Im sure there are plenty of books that cover it and I reference them at times but never read them front to back.

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Ok, reading the books looks like a damn good idea. I have only 25€ atm, so let's see if I can get it at the library or somewhere else[grin].

Ok, now for the sequencers:

With paintprograms you have Photoshop and Painter
With 3dprograms you have Maya and 3dsMax
With browsers you have Internet Explorer and Firefox
What are the mainly used sequencers?

And I guess I'll need to find a way to plug in my electric guitar or keyboard?

-Stenny

EDIT
Is this one of the books nsmadsen?:

amazon

It's 3 cents cheaper than the fat man's guide[smile]. And 23,77 isn't that much. There will be shipping costs though.

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The sequencers, and people will try to argue this list, but these are the ones that I have come acorss most frequently being used in games, television and film. (I know this is a games forum, but it also helps to know the others.)

In no specific order:

Logic Pro 7.1 - Logic Express
Digital Performer 4.6 & 5
Cubase SX3 (Also SX2)
Sonar 3, 4, 5
Ableton Live
Protools (I encounted very few people who use this for MIDI solely)
Reason 3

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Mac Only:
Logic Pro 7.1 - Logic Express
Digital Performer 4.6 & 5

Pc Only:
Sonar 3, 4, 5

Mac and PC:
Cubase SX3 (Also SX2)
Ableton Live
Protools - Ive seen PT on macs more than PC's though.
Reason 3

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I'm interested in the new Macs that can run both Windows and Mac progs. This, for me, might be an upgrade I'd make in a few years. This way I could have access to both set of tools.

Does anyone use one of those setups now? If so, are you happy with it?

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