• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Akura

I'm faster... so how can I... ??

2 posts in this topic

I know that Diablo (and probably other games) speeds up characters by removing frames from the animation. For instance, a normal fighter will have an 8 frame "quick downward chop" animation for a normal sword. If the sword has the "of Speed" suffix, 1 of the 8 frames are removed, if the sword has the "of Haste" suffix, 3 of the 8 frames are removed. Given the fact that you know the rate of the swing (the frames are timed) you can calculate how many frames you need for a certain swing speed.

-fel

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi, its me again (youre getting tired of putting me up arent you ?? )

OK. this one is a lttle tricky

Im doing a fighting game but where the fighters have different speed, for ex. the speed can go through 1 to 10, if its 10 the fighter will perform a kick in .3 seconds and if it is 1 it will perform in 1.3 seconds.

How to implement this is the tricky stuff. I was thinking i could create a timer everytime the kick started and then kill the timer when it ended (Win32 timers) but i think this can be slow (i think the CreateTimer of the Win32 API is a little slow and not muhc accurate...

Any other thoughts about this ???

thks

Yours friend Akura

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yuck! That IS a nasty way to cut animations (I don't think your art department are going to be all that thrilled about chopping away every other frame to make it move faster )!

Use high performance timers under windows to count game time, and assign a "delay" to each frame in the animation (To achieve faster or slower animations, multiply this by a speed factor e.g. 1.2 to get 20% increase in delay).

In you main render loop, check the time passed since last rendering and update your framecounter accordingly. I.e. if the next 4 frames in an animation has delays 12,17,14 and 20 ms, and the time passed is 31, you skip the first two frames, and timestamp the animation with 2 (31-(12+17)).

The trick is that because most animations run 12 or 25fps, while the game runs 40+, you rarely, if ever, have to skip more than one frame per refresh, yet you have the advantage of animating with almost ms accuracy.

/Niels

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites