Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Deltasquadron2

Need an efficient way to share files!

This topic is 4477 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello! I'm currently working on a game with a friend and we have been exchanging files back and forth via email. It is not exactly the most efficient method. So can someone recommend a good CVS software that we can use? Also,I have a web sever, would that be a necessary part for setting up the CVS? Thanks!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I agree TortoiseSVN is very user friendly! I got it working in within a few minutes. What is the benefit of Subversion? I got a confused when I try to set that one up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for the guys above, I recommend Subversion (aka SVN) instead of CVS. It is much more flexible. It hasn't got limitations on renaming and deleting files and it handles binary files nicely.

I have briefly used TortoiseSVN and Subclipse Eclipse plugin at work, but I personally prefer the command line tool.

You don't need a webserver to run SVN. But you do need some machine both of you can connect to. I have my SVN repository on my desktop linux box, which is not even up 24/7. It's good enough when there's just one or two developers, but for bigger projects you certainly need a server that's up 24/7.

There are many ways to set up an SVN repository. First, you can use svnserve, Subversion's built-in server. It is the simplest one to set up and works fine. The transactions are not secure (as in encrypted) but I have no value for such a feature (you might have). Logins and passwords are encrypted, tho. Another way is to set up svn over ssh, which requires the server to have ssh accounts for all the developers. It also requires you to handle the file permissions of the repository. svn+ssh as it is called, is secure and encrypted. The third option is to use SVN in conjunction with a webserver using the WebDAV module. You can use HTTP for non-secure transactions or HTTPS for secure transactions. Using svn over http(s) requires the most work to set up (at least on a unix box where there's already ssh).

You can also sign up for a free svn repository. At least sourceforge.net has free svn repositories for open source projects. If you're not doing open source (why not?), sourceforge might not be an option. I don't know about other svn service providers, but I do know some exist and I don't know whether or not they require your software to be open source.

Exchanging source files with e-mail is very inefficient and frustrating. One of my projects went down in flames, because we didn't set up a svn repository early enough.

Oh yeah, the subversion home page is at:
http://subversion.tigris.org/
And "The SVN book" (a very good read) is freely downloadable at:
http://svnbook.red-bean.com/

The book tells you everything you need to know to set up your repositories. If you're on linux, use your distribution's package management and initscripts to install and start up your svn services, don't do it by hand!

Hope this helps!
-Riku

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You just need* your very own closet computer**.

1) Get an old junk computer for practically nothing***. CPU speed is largely unimportant, but you should try for at least 32 MB of ram, and as much disk space as you can find. Old computers don't like modern hard disks, so anything over 40GB probably won't work.

2) Install Linux on it. Skip everything you don't need. You pretty much just want the base linux system, sshd, and svnserve.

3) After you have sshd running, you can hide your computer in a closet and continue this from your main computer. In Windows, you can connect using Putty.

4) Forward ports to the computer so it can be accessed from the internet. (sshd uses 22, svnserve uses 3690)

6) Use a service like No-IP or DynDNS so people on the interweb don't need to know your IP address to connect to you.

7) Pat your self on the back for a job well done. Your project now has it's very own dedicated 24/7 server which will look something like this:


* This is a lie, you don't need any of this at all.
** Locking computers in closets is cruel and may or may not be a fire hazard.
*** This only costs nothing if you consider your time worthless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Thanks guys! Also, I came across this site call opensvn.csie.org

Does anyone have any experience(good/bad) with this site before I begin a repository for my project?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!