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C# What is the graphics library like?

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is there is one at all. I have herd it is like c/c++ and java with garbage collection but does it have its own graphics library like java. if so or not what is the best graphics library to use with it, basically the easiest to setup and learn. thanks in advance

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There are C# wrappers for OpenGL (Tao Framework) and DirectX. For simple drawing, you can use Windows GDI. If you're looking for a complete framework, you have the C# OpenGL Framework, which is nice for small demo applications - the free version has basic functionality, and there are other versions that cost $$.

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The System.Drawing namespace in Microsoft.NET provides a lot of useful 2d graphics functionality, although you'll need a surface (such as a System.Windows.Forms.PictureBox) to display it. There is also SdlDotNet, which provides SDL services for .NET languages.

And as already mentioned, there's Tao.OpenGL for OGL on .NET and there's also Managed DirectX. As for GDI, or even GDI+, it's best to avoid directly using either of them unless you know your P/Invoke. If you want to go for those functions, use System.Drawing, as (at least with Microsoft.NET) they wrap around GDI while providing more features.

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Then you certainly want to go with System.Drawing with winforms, or SdlDotNet. However, you shouldn't dismiss the 3d APIs out of hand -- you can do much the same work as with the 2d APIs, but it'll execute faster as nobody has bothered with 2d acceleration in almost 10 years. (I've not tried it myself, to be honest, but a lot of people have.)

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There's also Rob Loach's own BooGame. I'm not sure how suitable it is for full-fledged game development yet, though.

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BooGame is for Boo, the same way that PyGame is for Python. I guess there might be some way to use it in C#, but not as the primary development language.

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Quote:
Original post by coldacid
BooGame is for Boo, the same way that PyGame is for Python. I guess there might be some way to use it in C#, but not as the primary development language.


Hmm. I was under the impression that it used Boo as a scripting language, but was written in C#, and targeted .NET 1.1, 2.0 and Mono in general. The examples on the library's webpage also are written in both C# and Boo. For example.

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Quote:
Original post by GeoMX
Also, you can use Managed DirectX...

I already mentioned that earlier.

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BooGame works very well for 2D graphics, though it doesn't focus on FPS but more at "Time between updates", which is pretty neat.

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Quote:
Original post by coldacid
Quote:
Original post by GeoMX
Also, you can use Managed DirectX...

I already mentioned that earlier.


You're right, sorry!

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There is also XNA (a beta of XNA Game Studio Express will be available later this month). Lets Kill Dave! has an overview of how it differs from Managed DirectX.

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