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Opinions on Ubuntu?

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I'm a Debian user and am considering switching to Ubuntu because of the somewhat simpler interface and the powerful Debian backend. I'm not interested in plumbing the depths of linux. I just want things to WORK! I do C++ programming, web development (which requires an installed apache / PHP / MySQL setup), internet, email, and writing on the system. I need Wacom graphics tablet support, Nvidia GForce4MX card drivers, and it has to work on a blah NForce2 board w/ AMD Athlon chip. I already have Debian installed but it has some funny quirks that bug me (mostly software bugs, not Debian's fault). But i'm also looking at repartitioning my hard drives which means i have to wipe them out and reinstall the base system anyway. I figured it might be a good time to jump for Ubuntu if it will make sysadmin easier. Any opinions?

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Ubuntu works fine for me. I can't compare it with Desktop Debian since use Debian only on servers. Two remarks that come to mind:

1) Make sure you get the recently released ISO's, not the old one's. 6.06.1 is out with all patches to date applied.
2) The C/C++ development enviroment is NOT installed by default. Just apt-get build-essential

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i say go for it. ubuntu 6.06 is the first linux distribution i've found worthy of replacing windows. i'm not sure about tablet support, but my geforce 6800gs/nforce4/athlon64 system works perfectly even before installation from the livecd. installing the nvidia drivers is as simple as "sudo apt-get install nvidia-glx", "sudo nvidia-xconfig", log out, ctrl+alt+backspace to restart x. i also managed to install and configure apache2 and vsftpd in only a few minutes with little previous experience. very worthy of both desktop and server.

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there's no net install that i know of, but i haven't looked recently. i've only used the desktop install cd which is also a livecd. i kinda got a kick out of installing an os while listening to streaming radio stations on talking on aim/icq.

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I use Ubuntu 5 for my desktop machine, and I actually use a chopped-down version of it for my development-, web-, and file-server. I've used straight Debian before, but found it difficult to find all the right options for a good desktop install; Ubuntu gives you an excellent desktop install right out of the box.

These days I use windows on my laptop for one reason alone; I can't find Linux drivers for the on-board wireless NIC it uses.

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Quote:
Original post by Wyrframe
I use Ubuntu 5 for my desktop machine, and I actually use a chopped-down version of it for my development-, web-, and file-server. I've used straight Debian before, but found it difficult to find all the right options for a good desktop install; Ubuntu gives you an excellent desktop install right out of the box.


Exactly. Debian is nice once it is setup correctly, but you have to go in and configure everything by hand first. You shouldn't have to go through "font de-uglyfication" steps before setting up a decent desktop, know what i mean?

I'll try to get ubuntu on my machine when i'm ready to re-partition my HD's. I'm also considering getting XP or Vista in the future so that i can do cross-platform programming and package distribution.

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Quote:
Original post by leiavoia
Debian is nice once it is setup correctly, but you have to go in and configure everything by hand first.


the only thing i had to configure manually was adding "1280x1024" to xorg.conf, but i've had to do that with every dist using this monitor. the default desktop install is good stuff.

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I might recommend Xandros V4 instead: I installed it on my AMD64/GeForce 7600/nForce4 and it worked out of the box, no tweaks, no installation of drivers, 1280x1024 resolution. The Premium edition comes with a printed manual and development system on disk (the non-premium requires a one-click download).

I admit they pay me (not to plug the system, I'm just a developer), but I use the system because it doesn't require me to spend time installing drivers and tweaking the system so I can spend more time programming (and, um, surfing the internet amd playing games).

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If you use Ubuntu, upgrade the kernel to the latest stable version available, using the Synaptics manager. Also pick the kernel that is right for your CPU (386 / K7) . There's really a speed improvement. ANd - I've read the .17 kernel that is planned for Edgy Eft is even faster (needs manual compiling however..tricky)..

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Ubuntu is awesome.

I personally use Kubuntu 6.06 as I prefer the KDE environment to the Gnome one (gave both a try, KDE was more to my taste).

I've been using it since v4 (Breezy?).

I've spent numerous hours in Redhat and Mandrake, and I'd have to say Ubuntu is by far more "human" oriented as they claim to be.

Software installation is simple using Synaptic or (preferred) apt-get from the command line.

There are numerous sources for support, namely http://ubuntuforums.org/, http://ubuntuguide.org/, and Canonical's own support line.

It's not "totally" ready for the desktop (is any Linux?) given the state of Wine/Cedega, but I've been able to get a few choice Windows-only apps working using Wine. Games of course are another matter.

Ubuntu's own release cycle is every 6 months, which appears to be greater than any other Linux distro's. That means that you can expect major bug fixes, newer features, and movement toward a more user-friendly platform as time goes on.

Also, given the state of SDL and OpenGL, Ubuntu makes a decent development platform.

If you have any questions, I'd be happy to try to help :)

Cheers,
- m³

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I just started a new job and i'm using kubuntu on my workstation. It's very nice. Normally, i stick with Enlightenment, but i haven't had the time to set it up the way i like it yet. I've been using the default KDE setup. KDE has a lot of bells and whistles to it, i think i might make the switch from Enlightenment! The help files were also helpfull (how ironic!)

I will definately be installing kubuntu in the near future.

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I use Ubuntu 6.06 at home and at work. I never used it until I began my new job back in April and have not regretted it. I've used other popular distros of linux and have to say that I'm probably happiest with Ubuntu. Other than the Wacom, everything else should work with little to no effort (haven't tried the tablet, so I simply don't know, you can search the forums).

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I've used Ubuntu occasionally, but I always end up coming back to Debian. Every time I've tried it I've noticed no difference at all except for minor stability problems in Ubuntu that just aren't there in Debian, and somewhat worse performance.

Perhaps I haven't noticed any difference simply because I'm used to doing things the hard way,thus missing out on possibly excellent GUI alternatives.

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I just installed it on my iBook.

There was a problem with the screen - it insisted on running 1024x768 but it only goes up to 800x600. But that was only an issue specific to this computer.

Otherwise the system is brain dead simple and it works.

Once installed I just went to the Add\Remove thing and installed Abiword and Blender and so on. Nothing to it.

Apt-get is about a billion times faster than Yum. I hate Yum. On Fedora I have Yum. Sometimes it doesn't work, spits out errors about bad XML. And it always takes forever downloading and grinding through lists of files or something. It will sit there processing for about 5 minutes before telling me "Nothing to do" because it doesn't have the package I asked for.

At least when apt-get doesn't have something it tells me right away even on my old computers.

(I've got a 466mhz iBook, 400mhz Octane2 and a 733mhz Pentium3.(

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i've been using ubuntu for a time, and was very satisfied.
but i would recommend MEPIS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MEPIS
it's based on ubuntu but with kde ( ususally gnome is preinstalled ), it has better hardware recognition.

anyway as long if its debian, it rocks ;)

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I couldn't get it to work, or Mandrake - Gentoo worked though, for a short time before the machine died.

May be I'll try it again, it seems to have an active developers and forums, and is properly free and not leading to one or another commerical product like Red Hat or Mandrake.

Red Hat Fedora Core 2 got it's knickers in a twist with some dependency loop that wouldn't let me uninstall something until I installed something that depended on something I couldn't install. Obviously that was ages ago.

Mandrake I was most impressed with things "just working". Even installed my TV Card and sound drivers for me.

I would think as a Debian user you'll find yourself right at home in Ubuntu though. It's Debian, just more on the edge isn't it?

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Quote:
Original post by mauzi_the_Dude
i've been using ubuntu for a time, and was very satisfied.
but i would recommend MEPIS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MEPIS
it's based on ubuntu but with kde ( ususally gnome is preinstalled ), it has better hardware recognition.

anyway as long if its debian, it rocks ;)


The Ubuntu distribution includes Gnome as the window manager. Kubuntu includes KDE.

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I had Ubuntu installed for a month or two. It is really user-friendly distro.
If you need a distro which just works "out-of-box" Ubuntu is for you.
However it has some things that I don't like, i.e. it installs so many apps that I don't need.

I like more controln of my system so now turned back to Slackware. It's much simpler in administration. Very easy scripts and I don't need to click through million windows to enable or disable something. It also boots much faster.

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I love Ubuntu! I got my 6.06 LTS CD(s) in the mail the other day, and I'm very happy with it so far. DVD playback, wmv, and others aren't available out of the box - but it's easy enough to setup with totem-xine and the likes. Plus, the nvidia driver install is a breeze with the nvidia-glx package.

Anyway, give it a shot, it's the only thing I have on my computer now - it was either that or an illegal copy of Windows XP Home.

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I didn't see the netinstall question answered, but last I used Ubuntu(5.10) it did have net install so I'm pretty sure they continued the trend.

Ubuntu is good, but not good enough to tear me from my arch and pacman

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