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gonzo

IDE for C++ in Ubuntu/Gnome

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Hi all, I recently switched to Ubuntu 6.06 from Windows and am looking for a good IDE. I tried using kdevelop but found the interface to be tedious and hard to use, I just couldn't get used to it. I am very used to using Visual Studio 2003. What other IDE would you recommend for C++? Thanks, Matt

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The next names that come to mind are Anjuta and Code::Blocks. To be honest with you though, I don't really care for Linux IDEs. It takes a while to get used to, but when it comes to Linux I surprised myself by really agreeing with the philosophy that a text editor and a terminal window is the best solution. I actually wouldn't say I like that any less than an IDE either, in Linux at least.

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Thanks, I will try anjuta and code::blocks. If I dont like either of those I will just use gedit and a command line.

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kdevelop and anjuta seem to work fine for me, but i'm not very impressed by either of them. you can also install eclipse from the repository and install the cdt plugin, but it's not the latest version of eclipse and you'll have to get the proper cdt plugin that works with that version. it may be better to download the latest eclipse instead if you decide to try that. i still haven't tried code::blocks yet but probably will soon.

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there is a version of cdt that works with the latest eclipse, eclipses download page just lists a year old download for some reason. it took me a good long while to get working in windows, but its there and works :)

next trial is getting cvs working over ssh :
overall im not impressed with cdt in eclipse, but im rather certain that its mostly to do with having to use cygwin/mingw. some days i like eclipse alot, other days i miss vim.

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thought i'd just add some details...

the latest version of eclipse is 3.2, but the ubuntu repository still has 3.1. the latest version of the cdt plugin is 3.1 and works with eclipse 3.2. i accidentally grabbed cdt 3.1 using eclipse 3.1 from the repository and found it would freeze on startup.

cdt 3.0.x works with eclipse 3.1 from the repository, but it's likely a better idea to just download the latest eclipse and cdt anyway. (i haven't gotten around to it yet)

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i just tried the latest eclipse with the cdt plugin on my athlon64 3200+ with 1gb ddr ram and it was like trying to run windows vista on a gameboy. i think gedit is the way to go.

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Anjuta is nice to start with, untill you need to customize the build files. Then it becomes a bit unwieldy. I did my first Linux programming in Ajnuta so that I didn't have to learn the entire GNU build system top get something basic going. After that, I ripped the makefiles to shreds, learnt what the pieces do and rewrote them. Then I dumped Anjuta for a text editor and the command line :-)

Sometimes I use Nano (for quick edits), sometimes gedit or BlueFish. It depends. I still use Glade for UI design though.

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Eclipse is the only Linux ide that hasn't crashed on me during the first 15 minutes, nor has it ever left itself or the project files in an inconsistent state. This may sound harsh but Eclipse, even with the not-so-stellar CDT, feels like a real tool in comparison to the other toys mentioned here. And I've tried most of them several times.

- KDevelop felt like it had two new features with new twenty bugs added for each bug fixed. All in all a confusing mess where half of the things soft-of worked if the stars were right.
- Anjuta seemed to have a broken design. Too many things were hard-coded and getting the whole glued-together mess to crash was rather easy.
- Code::Blocks had a broken Linux build system that I had to hack around. When I got it to work, it was quite a bit better than either KDevelop or Anjuta, but still not too difficult to crash or confuse. I admit I haven't tried it in a while, though. Besides Eclipse CDT, this would be a project I would have high hopes for if the latest release weren't almost a year old.
- MinGW Developer Studio felt like such a lame and primitive copy of MSVC it made me feel bad for using it. It appears to be unmaintained too. It is simple and as such does not crash as easily as the others, though. Then again it doesn't have many advantages over a simple editor either.


Unless you are writing Java, editors and consoles will probably give you the most flexibility and the least amount of frustration. Unfortunately this means you have to live without out-of-the-box code completion, but AFAIK MSVC is the only system capable of doing that properly for C++ anyway. CDT seems to be getting there, though.

Using no IDE also gives you the advantage of scriptable build systems. For example, you can have your makefiles unzip and compile an external library, compile and run code to generate more code out of tables, compile and run test cases etc. without having to look after the IDE when it gets confused.

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I usually just use gedit with the external tools plugin and hand built makefiles. It's worked well for me, but most of my linux projects are rather small. I doubt that solution would scale well to larger projects.

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Quote:
Original post by 255
Eclipse is the only Linux ide that hasn't crashed on me during the first 15 minutes, nor has it ever left itself or the project files in an inconsistent state. This may sound harsh but Eclipse, even with the not-so-stellar CDT, feels like a real tool in comparison to the other toys mentioned here. And I've tried most of them several times.


what os and java platform(s) is this on? i find it hard to believe that the latest eclipse with cdt can be as bad as what i saw today. i probably have to fix something.

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I've used Eclipse on both Windows and Linux as per project requirements a few months ago, and it was enough to make me doubt I'll ever be willing to use it again. Eclipse was probably the single most painful IDE experience I've had: It just thinks it knows more about the project than the programmer, and most of the time I felt like I was fighting the IDE instead of using it. Try doing anything with the project's files outside of the IDE and watch it hit the panic button. Stuff like that meant making it cooperate with Subversion was unnecessarily painful.

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Creating real GUI tools that run well in all cases takes hard work and dedication to annoying details over a long time, by people with a certain skill set. Open Source model seems to lack when it comes to getting this working, unless there is a corporate sponsor that kicks in money to make it happen. Meanwhile, the kernel and drivers are mostly all stable, because that's a different kind of work, that seems to attract a lot more successful projects.


On UNIX, I use vim, and The Non-Recursive Make File.

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Unsure if this merits a new thread... I'm in the *exact* situation as the original poster.

Despite years of dependence on ms devstudio, I'll go with the editor & makefiles to start my linux programming journey...

but what do you guys use for debugging? (or don't linux progammers write any bugs?) ;)

btw, thanks to hplus for the makefile tips (and NAT-punch too, as I recall).

-fa

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Thanks for all the responses. So far I am enjoying code::blocks quite a bit. I am using the GDB debugger with it and havent had any crashes or problems yet. Instead of doing a custom build I just downloaded the latest nightly build deb package and installed that.

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