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Lollyn00b

C/C++ programming for a TI-84+?

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Hello, I just got a TI-84+ SE, and I was wondering if there was a way to make apps for it without having to learn (z80 I think) ASM. I'd use TI-Basic, if it weren't so darn slow and limited for games. If anyone knows if there's a way to convert C/C++ code to z80 ASM, or anything of that sort, please tell me. Also, please tell me if this whole idea is rediculous, and that I should better start finding ASM tutorials. I've got some experience in C++, but I could learn C if I needed to; I'm currently using Dev-C++. Thanks ahead of time :P

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There is no way to convert the code... but there is a program called SquirrelBox if I remember right which has c like syntax but produces ti84 machine code. This would be a pretty good choice if you really wanted to develop for it.
I know there is one more like this but i can't remember the name. Go to TIcalc.org and search their archive in the windows section for it. If you get stuck email me at stiffler_shade@yahoo.com and i'll try to help.
P.S. when i started programming this was a big hobby of mine :).

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The only calculators that enable you to link to you PC and download C/C++ compiled programs (to the native language) is for the TI-89, TI-92, and anything higher than that. Some people have created "translators" from what I hear, taking C and turning it into Z80, but I have yet to see one.

That's my 2 cents, sorry bud. Better start looking for tutorials.

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I am not sure about the TI 84+. I do know you can use gcc to write C based applications for the TI 89 Titanium. TI should have information regarding this... looks like the TI 83 uses the Z80. Try zilog

TI-83 SDK

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Thanks for telling me about SquirrelBox, Stiffler; the syntax is a lot like C++, so it's easy to understand for me. I've yet to actually compile the ASM code it outputs, but if it works that'll be awesome.

Edit: Is there a way to turn pixels on and off in SquirrelBox? It seems kind of limited, now that I take a second look at it...

[Edited by - Lollyn00b on August 17, 2006 8:17:22 PM]

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Really, you should learn Z80 assembly. There aren't really any higher level compilers that produce decent code for the Z80 yet.

I strongly recommend this tutorial. I personally would swap the TASM assembler for Brass, though I might be a little biased in that respect. [wink]

If you want help, join this board.

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I did something for my TI-85 some years ago. I don't know what is inside the TI-84+, so these things might not apply.

1) Go to ticalc.org, it's _the_ source for doing stuff with your TI
2) Check out if there is a C compiler available. There was something called SmallC available for the 85. Then theres TIGCC for TI-89 and TI-92. There might be something for the TI-84+, too.
3) Read programming tutorials on the 84+. There hopefully is something at ticalc.org
4) If all else fails go the assembler way. The TI-85 was a nice platform to code assembler with. The Z80 is a rather nice processor and there was lots of code and functions readily available for the 85, perhaps for the 84 too.

You might also want to check out other compiler projects, if they have a compatible backend, or perhaps you could try to write one yourself. This requires big time hacking skills, tho.

BTW. Does the TI-84+ in fact have a Z80 in it? I thaught all the new TI's got M6k8 processors.

-Riku

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Quote:
Original post by RichardoX
BTW. Does the TI-84+ in fact have a Z80 in it? I thaught all the new TI's got M6k8 processors.
The TI-84+ is effectively a TI-83+, just with more storage (archive) space, USB hardware, a real-time clock, crystal-based timing (which you can switch to 15MHz in software). That sort of thing. 83+ assembly programs run happily on the 84+ (I believe the term TI use is "keystroke compatible").

Learn TI-83 Plus Assembly In 28 Days is generally regarded as the best tutorial. I personally prefer this one, but it's presented more as a reference with sample code than holding your hand through all of the development, which is why I prefer it.

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