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daniel_i_l

[.net] C# book

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I moderatly know C++ and want to learn C# with .net. What is a good book to start with? Is there a book that teaches the above and how to use it with WinForms or would I need a seperate book for that? Thanks.

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With .NET 1.1 (VS 2003) I highly recommended beginners use "Beginning Visual C#" [published by WROX press] which covers the langauge, the IDE tools, and the framework (ado.net, forms, asp.net) in a good basic way.

For going further with Forms programming, "Windows Forms Programming in C#" by Chris Sells was absolutely great.

I then highly recomended "Effect C#" for advanced C# questions (about properly overloading operators, Dispose, hashcode, finalizers, serialization, etc).

Of course all of these things we're for .NET 1.1

"The C# Programming Langauge" is also a good book that tried to copy the Stroustroup C++ reference style (and has a 2.0 chapter in the back).

I have 2.0 books now, but haven't read much of them, so can't make a strong recommendation.

It seems that McDonald and Sells write the most highly recommended Forms programming books.

P.S. You don't NEED a Forms specific book, I went for a year without one - but when I had a paying job to write a Forms based application I bought one and it added the little details I needed to create an actual profession product.

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Thanks, two questions:
- if I have the VisualC# Express version will all those books apply, or do i need the Standerd verion (as it said in the "requirements" part of the Beginning Visual C# description)?
- is there a difference between Beginning Visual C# and
Beginning Visual C# 2005?
Thanks.

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Quote:
Original post by alexmullins
"Programming C# 4th Edition" by Jesse Liberty
Very good book.

Quote:
Original post by daniel_i_l
if I have the VisualC# Express version will all those books apply, or do i need the Standerd verion (as it said in the "requirements" part of the Beginning Visual C# description)?
Nope, there might be some minor difference in steps taken to accomplish tasks, but it should be easy to figure out.

Quote:
Original post by daniel_i_l
- is there a difference between Beginning Visual C# and
Beginning Visual C# 2005?
"Beginning Visual C#" might target .NET 1.1, while "Beginning Visual C# 2005" might target .NET 2.0. Once you know most of .NET 1.1, it's easy to pick up the differences and learn what's new. The big difference is Generics, which you'll eventually get into. Another thing is that you're looking for just an introduction crash course into both the language and the framework. Once you get that introduction, it's easy to go off on your own and learn things through reading the Microsoft documentation. I really recommend you pick up that Jesse Liberty book though.

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As the last poster said, the version I used was when VS 2003 was out with .NET 1.1, the 2005 edition is an update to use Visual Studio 2005. .NET 2.0 adds generics and a fairly different data source / data view control system - but otherwise is almost identical (most .NET 1.1 compiles with no changes).

There are Many differences between the editions when it comes to using pluding addons or managing multiple project solutions (the express edition can't do it I think), but otherwise they are nearly identical. The book might even point out which things are different as it covers them (the 2003 edition covered differences between Standard and Professional, so I'd assume 2005 would also cover the express editions a little).

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Quote:
Original post by alexmullins
"Programming C# 4th Edition" by Jesse Liberty
The book says it's aimed at people who are already familiar with programming. Since you already know C++ it won't be that hard to get the hang of C#.


^^^^
Though it's a little light on form stuff and some of the .NET Library parts, it'll verse you in the syntax so you can hunt down that other stuff with greater ease.

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