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Quick python/pygame (non-coding) question

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I don't know where or who else I would direct this question to, so I'll make a new thread. Quick question concering python and How to Think Like a Computer Scientist. I'm currently reading this e-book (up to chpt. 7 invloving strings), and was wondering if, in the gamedev members' opinions, I would be ready for pygame after finishing this book and all the exersizes. Just looking into the future a bit. [grin] Thanks!

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Original post by Oluseyi
Quote:
Original post by kevtimc
[Would I] be ready for pygame after finishing [How to Think Like a Computer Scientist] and all the exercises?

Yes. In fact, for simple game designs, you might be ready now. That's half the appeal/beauty of Python.


[wow] Now? What do you mean by simple game designs?

EDIT: Just to clairify, I wouldn't start using pygame just yet, my goal is to become profficient in python, not to shove a simple game out there as soon as possible.

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Original post by drakostar
You learn a language by using it. A lot. There's little reason not to dive right into the PyGame tutorials after you learn the basic syntax of Python, using reference material as needed.


Would it mather either way? Is there a better choice?

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I think I downloaded that book a while back... then I got distracted by playing with Pygame, and forgot to read it. ;P

I don't think there's an absolute "better choice" between learning from a book (and exercises) and learning from experimentation (and documentation). The better choice for you is whichever helps you learn and keeps you motivated. Drakostar and I are obviously of the "dive in" persuasion, but you may be a book person. So, do whatever works for you.

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That far into the book you'll find that if you look at the PyGame documentation and samples you'll actually be able to figure out a lot of it without too much trouble, and refer back to the book for anything you're still having trouble with. Therefore as long as you're able to nut out the logic of the game you're trying to make you'd probably be able to start creating some games.

So yes, once you're finished the text you should be fine to try out PyGame. Everyone learns differently, so it's up to you whether you'd like to jump in and have a play now or actually finish the book beforehand. Remember you can always stop playing around with PyGame and go back to the book if you try it and find it too difficult.

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Thanks for the help, I'll think about what I should do next. I have another question:

Before I graduate from pygame my goal would be to create a quick 2D demo of an rpg style game. Although I'm not designing the game, I'm pretty sure we are using sprites. So I was wondering, is pygame going to be able to handle 16 bit sprites and simple animations for them? I'm guessing the answer is yes, but it's always good to make sure. Also, does anyone know of any programs out there that let you draw, pixel-by-pixel, 8 or 16 bit sprites?

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Original post by kevtimc
So I was wondering, is pygame going to be able to handle 16 bit sprites and simple animations for them? I'm guessing the answer is yes, but it's always good to make sure.

PyGame has a very powerful and flexible Sprite class, and there are a few libraries out there that extend it to do some very cool things.

Seriously. Unlike C or C++, where the "do you know the language first?" question in a pissy voice is quite appropriate, Python is a "jump right in"-friendly language. [smile]

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