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x64 applications in MS VC++ 2003 .NET?

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As the title goes, can x64 applications be made with Microsoft Visual C++ 2003 .NET? I read somewhere that x86 processors are not being manufactured anymore, so I may need to compile my programs onto the x64 platform. So, do I realy need to get MS Visual Studio 2005 .NET or can I still do that on 2003? Thanx

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If x86 processors are manufactered or not, is not in my knowledge, but developing for x64 can be done with VS .NET 2003. You must however download the Microsoft platform SDK.

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Pure .net CLR applications will run natively on x64.

Otherwise, it will run in 32-bit compatibility mode, which has an unnoticeable but measurable performance hit.

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Quote:
Original post by LeChuckIsBack
I read somewhere that x86 processors are not being manufactured anymore, so I may need to compile my programs onto the x64 platform.

They are still being manufacured.

I don't believe any of the in-development named chipsets are x86. They are either AMD64 or EM64T, depending on who makes it.

(Yes, there are minor differences between the two brands of chips, x64 is Microsoft's neutral name for the two chipsets, and no it is not IA64 which is used for the Itanium line.)

New designs are AMD64/EM64T processors and will run with microsoft's x64-named products.

Unfortunately there is very little ISV support for Windows x64 drivers. Vista x64 will have better support than XP x64, and XP x64 was better than Server. But they are all still missing a lot of drivers.

Most notable is the very few printer drivers. The drivers must be written using the x64 libraries in order to work, so vendors hare having to do a lot of development. Don't expect the disposable printers to have x64 drivers. In the corporate office especially, verify that network printers have x64 drivers before migrating.

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Quote:
Original post by LeChuckIsBack
Thanks, that's good to know, but can you be more precise?


How precise do you need it. I mean, go to microsoft.com, download the platform sdk, install it. Set all paths correct in visual studio. Then run the 64-bit console or maybe even directly from VS2005. Speaks for itself I guess.

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x86 processors are still being made, and will be for some time. As someone else noted, there is still very little driver support for x64 systems. It could be several years before the porting process is complete. Win x64 (both Vista and XP Pro) have a service named WOW64 (Windows on Windows 64). Basically its an x86 emulation layer to allow 32 bit applications to run on the 64 bit machines. Windows 95-XP (x86 Versions) have a similar process named WOW which allowed older 16 bit Windows 3.11 and below applications to theorectically be able to run on the Windows 32 bit OS's. What you may have read, is that the 64 bit systems will no longer support the emulation of the 16 bit applications. 16 bit applications should be ported to either x86 or x64.

I personally think alot of manuafactures have been holding off developing new 64 Bit drivers for XP Pro x64, because of the new driver model in Vista. Therefore, they are most likely focusing on the development of Vista x64 drivers instead. After Vistas launch, we should see a slow and steady migration to x64 machines over the next few years. However, x86 is not disappearing anytime soon, and 32 bit applications will be capable of running on Windows x64.

Recommended reading: Is Win XP Pro x64 Right For Me?

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