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Going in the Army

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I've been talking with a recruiter and I'm going in the Army. For what, I'm not sure yet, I have to see what is available. I'm a little worried about the ASVAB. So I've been studying a lot for it. What do you guys think? I'm excited and nervous at the same time.

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PS: I'm mainly worried because I want to do good for my self and my country. Fear of failure I guess.

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I wonder what kind of computer/tech jobs I can get in the Army? After I finished my time in the service, wouldn't my experience help get me a job as a programmer? Say if I went in for Information Technology Specialist. From the description I read, it sounds like an Information Systems Analysts or (ISA). Imagery Analysts sound like it would be a fun job too.

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We dont have an Army here, so I dont know what I am talking about, but...

Do you have any computer science degrees? I mean college or technical degrees, not certifications, sounds to me that you wont get a System Analist job if you dont have a degree.

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Original post by tstrimp
Ironically, trained monkey could score well on the ASVAB.


Are you calling me a monkey?

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Original post by Mathachew
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Original post by tstrimp
Ironically, trained monkey could score well on the ASVAB.


Are you calling me a monkey?


Yes, but one of the smart ones who knows sign language and stuff.

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Original post by sakky
I'm going in the Army
...
I'm mainly worried because I want to do good for my self and my country
...
What do you guys think?

i think you're an idiot.

hey, you aksed.

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Original post by AnonymousPosterChild
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Original post by Mathachew
Quote:
Original post by tstrimp
Ironically, trained monkey could score well on the ASVAB.


Are you calling me a monkey?


Yes, but one of the smart ones who knows sign language and stuff.


Hey, I do know sign language... that's just weird O.o

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Original post by sakky
I wonder what kind of computer/tech jobs I can get in the Army? After I finished my time in the service, wouldn't my experience help get me a job as a programmer? Say if I went in for Information Technology Specialist. From the description I read, it sounds like an Information Systems Analysts or (ISA). Imagery Analysts sound like it would be a fun job too.


It depends entirely on what they need and what you score on your tests. You are in no way guarenteed to get a non-combat position, no matter what the recruiter tells you. Even so, the Army could be a valuable experience for you and if you don't get killed, you might get a college education out of it!

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Hopefully you didn't sign anything yet. If you can still change your mind I'd highly encourage you to reconsider.

1. The army recruiter isn't interested in your well being. He's interested in signing you up. Think of the recruiter as a car salesman - he'll tell you anything you want to hear to get you to sign up.
2. For some strange reason the army isn't required to put disclaimers in its commercials (be all you can be, p.s. you may get your limbs torn off for no good reason).
3. Doing good for the country is a noble goal but think about what you'll really be doing. For example, the founding fathers would likely say today's recruits are harming the country immensely due to a braindead foreign policy.
4. Ever see homeless guys that beg for money and claim they're vets? Why do you think that is? Because the country does a piss poor job taking care of them. If you happen to have your limbs torn off, how are you going to live on what'll likely be $1500 a month military pension? You'll come home and even though you went through hell and will never hug a girl again, nobody will feel like they owe you anything.
5. Are you prepared to kill innocent human beings for questionable reasons?

Once again, think about it again. Joining the army is a noble goal, but not right now. If you'd like to help yourself, go to a state university (very good and very cheap). If you'd like to help the country, read read read, and then write to your representatives, organize rallys, donate blood, volunteer in a hospital, etc. Please please please use your head.

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Original post by tstrimp
Quote:
Original post by sakky
I wonder what kind of computer/tech jobs I can get in the Army? After I finished my time in the service, wouldn't my experience help get me a job as a programmer? Say if I went in for Information Technology Specialist. From the description I read, it sounds like an Information Systems Analysts or (ISA). Imagery Analysts sound like it would be a fun job too.


It depends entirely on what they need and what you score on your tests. You are in no way guarenteed to get a non-combat position, no matter what the recruiter tells you. Even so, the Army could be a valuable experience for you and if you don't get killed, you might get a college education out of it!



That bears repeating. Army recruiters (who are just career soldiers being put through an ugly desk job) are under huge pressure (especially now that the military is stretched beyond its ability to defend America if a real threat where to emerge) to provide a certain number of warm bodies. Not all recruiters are shining angels - some will fudge applicant scores and hide information so that they can sneak in druggies, retards and career criminals to meet their quotas, while far more commonly others are going to make "promises" that they have no power keep.

If a recruiter says he can assure you x position (like flying a galaxy or being a computer tech), or that you'll do your duty state side, or anything other then you'll get trained with a gun and have a certain minimum pay grade, he's probably lying or "exaggerating" (lying with the excuse that what he said might be possible, but is neither guaranteed nor probable). Additionally any "education" promises will need to be taken with a grain of salt in the current climate - you could be as old as 28 (if you live and still have your
limbs attached) before you get to take advantage of that college tuition money (by which time inflation and tuition will have gone up).

If you join the army now you need to be sure you feel comfortable serving a few years doing back to back grunt tours in Iraq.

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I'd read this series of articles. It's from a former recruiter that basically describes in detail what you need from the recruiter etc. and what to expect during your service.

http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/joiningup/a/recruiter.htm

Basically anything the recruiter tells you, you need to have in writing. If it's not in writing, it's not going to happen. This is very important for bonuses and jobs.

If you go through with it, thanks for serving the country.

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Michalson is right. At one time, the US military might have lived up to its expectations and advertising. That time is long past. You have no guarantee of having a non-combat position, and I don't think conscientious(sp?) objectors are treated all that well.

You need to get out of this as fast as possible. If you still really want to help your country, there are many other things you can go for.

I appreciate the patriotic urge to serve, but unless you want to enter combat and risk life and limb, this is not the way to do it.

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I know the Air Force garauntees your MOS, and I believe the Navy does as well. I know the Marines specifically DO NOT garauntee it, but I always thought that the Army did.

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Original post by capn_midnight
I know the Air Force garauntees your MOS, and I believe the Navy does as well. I know the Marines specifically DO NOT garauntee it, but I always thought that the Army did.


The problem is, even if they are guaranteed, the recruits just take the recruiters word for it and that guarantees nothing.

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Original post by capn_midnight
I know the Air Force garauntees your MOS, and I believe the Navy does as well. I know the Marines specifically DO NOT garauntee it, but I always thought that the Army did.


The problem is, even if they are guaranteed, the recruits just take the recruiters word for it and that guarantees nothing.


that's why you should always read everything you sign. The recruiter can only pull a fast one over you if you don't pay attention to what is going on. If you do read everything and fully understand what is going to happen, and it DOES NOT happen, because the recruit fudged something, then you can sue.

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Original post by Ravuya
You have no guarantee of having a non-combat position, and I don't think conscientious(sp?) objectors are treated all that well.


If you are a "conscientious objector " you don't really sign up to be in the military at all (let alone during time of war), as everyone (even the cook or the computer tech) must go through basic training and is expected to be able to fire a gun should the enemy storm the kitchen.

If you are a conscientious objector but want to help your country in time of war (i.e. a legitimate war, but your belief in the teachings of Jesus or some other thinker makes it impossible for you to kill even if a gun is pointed at your head) then you look for a civilian position - civilian tech, hospital worker, factory, red cross, etc. A real conscientious objectors is someone who isn't afraid of dying themselves, but flatly refuses to kill another human being on principle or religious faith (sometimes extending to not being able to assist in any action that would knowingly lead to human death - i.e. won't fire a gun, and won't build the parts for one either).

The time when America really treated conscientious objectors badly (and we're talking back when conscientious objector meant something - someone who was drafted, did not specifically protest against the war, but could not accept a role in killing due to personal/religious beliefs) is long gone. Do you see todays conscientious objectors being subjected to death doctor experiments where a group is intentionally infected with a disease or bacteria, then they wait a different period with each one before amputating their limb to see which will live and which will die? (2 decades later the Nazi's would repeat America's WW1 death doctor experiments on Jews and other prisoners, mostly for the same purposes [finding how and when soldiers could be treated to improve recovery chances and better handle critical triage])

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Original post by capn_midnight
I know the Air Force garauntees your MOS, and I believe the Navy does as well. I know the Marines specifically DO NOT garauntee it, but I always thought that the Army did.

Sakky, I would find another source to back this up if the Corps is an option for you. My enlistment contract guaranteed me a position as a grunt. Granted, this was years ago, so it's possible that things have changed.

And as I say every time this pops up - Do not go in "open contract". You will not get to choose, rather, the choice will be made for you.

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5 seconds after i finished reading this thread i turned on the tv and the first thing i saw was the cnn headline "recruiter sex scandal"
coincidence?

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Man, I didn't I was going to get bashed on like this. an idiot am I? What ever. That doesn't sound like constructive criticism. Oh well.

I think the Army can do a lot for me and I want to serve my country. I would like to get some of the technical training the Army has to offer.

Any ways, the recruiter is blowing smoke up my ass because I know what I'm getting into or have a fairly good idea about it. I just thought I would spread the joy.

I'm not going to explain my self why I think its a good idea, but I'm sad to see so many of you complaining about the risks involved.

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No one is bashing you. They're worried that you are being impulsive, and want you to think before you sign away three years of your life.

I used to want to be in the military until I joined my school's ROTC program. They spend a lot of time educating you on the sorts of things that you would need to do in the military. I didn't enjoy it, so I quit. But here's the thing: you can't quit. Once you sign, if you decide you don't like it, there's nothing you can do.

If you have your heart set on service, may I recommend joining the NAVY? IT's a good deal safer, and they have a better reputation when it comes to jobs involving electronics. The food will also be better, and you won't have to live in a tent in the desert (or worse, a barracks in South Korea in the demilitarized zone).

[Edited by - Drakkcon on September 26, 2006 7:02:04 PM]

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don't people get normally hired like civilians for programming/etc positions and stuff (and maybe into contractor companies)?

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Original post by sakky
Man, I didn't I was going to get bashed on like this. an idiot am I? What ever. That doesn't sound like constructive criticism. Oh well.

I think the Army can do a lot for me and I want to serve my country. I would like to get some of the technical training the Army has to offer.

Any ways, the recruiter is blowing smoke up my ass because I know what I'm getting into or have a fairly good idea about it. I just thought I would spread the joy.

I'm not going to explain my self why I think its a good idea, but I'm sad to see so many of you complaining about the risks involved.

A grand total of one person called you an idiot. Nobody else is bashing you, and the "complaining" about the risks is for your own benefit. Even if you're not particularly grateful, do you think you could at least refrain from belligerent ingratitude? Perhaps you *need* the experience of serving in a Hell hole for God-knows-how-long to appreciate the points made in this thread.

Nobody's asking you to "explain yourself". Maybe you've already made a comprehensive examination of the pros and cons, and the points made here have been redundant to you (but judging by defensiveness you displayed in the quote above, I wouldn't bet that you have the requisite maturity for this). Even so, what you need to realize is nobody here could know this, and chances are you're a naive gung-ho kid who doesn't really understand what he's getting into, so some folks tried to help you out. Again, even if the "give it some more thought" posts weren't constructive for you, ingratitude is not called for.

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