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Common Lisp - where to start?

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Good day. I'd like to learn Common Lisp. At my next job (that is, if they'll hire me), they have some subsystems written in CL. Also, it could be handy on higher years on my Uni to have a grasp on CL. So I'm searching for: - a compiler/interpreter - an IDE (?) - some tutorials/reference guide (I already know Scheme and Ocaml, so not necessary "for dummies") All free, off course. [smile] Now, if it requires linux, then it's a no-no - I'm a windows beast. I already made a run through this list of CL implementations, but it's mostly for linux or cygwin. What are people using, on a daily basis?

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You can give this a shot:
http://www.ufasoft.com/lisp/

They make a very small LISP interpreter + IDE. I mean very small, > 2 megs.

I've been meaning to learn lisp for ages, but never have gotten around to it. One of these days I'll do it, as I hear so many wonderful things about the language.

Another interesting thing to check out would be:

http://weblogs.asp.net/jtobler/archive/2003/10/01/30000.aspx

Appears Microsoft made a version of lisp at some point and shipped it as a .NET sample.

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I've always been a fan of clisp, (http://clisp.cons.org/) and yes it works just fine in windows. As for ide.... umm.... I used the windows version of Vi, which I realize is not to many peoples tastes. There was a decent little IDE For windows but the name/address escapes me at the moment. I have a decent book at home which I will post a link for after work. It's definately no 'for dummies book' and should get you up to speed reasonably quickly.

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An excellent free online book is Peter Seibel's Practical Lisp; I, myself also being familiar with Scheme and O'Caml, have enjoyed this book immensely mainly because it doesn't spend 100 pages describing variables and functions, but instead assumes prior programming experience and describes various practical aspects of the language (albeit somewhat superficially, but that's what the HyperSpec is for).
There's also the freely available Paul Graham's On Lisp. Norvig's book is also very good (but AFAIK, isn't free).

I use Allegro CL (the Lisp-in-a-box configuration with emacs/slime as described in Practical Lisp), there's also Corman Lisp and LispWorks. These are all free and work under Windows.

[Edited by - SamLowry on September 26, 2006 5:52:09 PM]

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In agreement with SamLowry (Allegro is a perfectly good Lisp environment, and Emacs with Slime is a brilliant IDE if you like Emacs, I'd like to add that LispWorks is a good implementation with an integrated IDE of its own, which (while somewhat emacslike itself) might be more approachable to someone who doesn't know eamcs already.

Also, Ufasoft's lisp is probably something to avoid. It doesn't appear stable (it crashed several times in my tests just now), and every indication I can find suggests it's just clisp with a thin (and broken) GUI wrapper. If it is, it's probably a GPL violation -- it certainly doesn't go out of its way to call attention to the clisp at its core.

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Thanks for the sugestions!

I'll go with Allegro CL.
The suggested Peter Seibel's Practical Lisp also looks nice and handy.

Thanks again!

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