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dev c++ profiler

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Hey I am trying to get acquainted with Dev C++. I am taking a data structures course this semester and would like to use some compiler profilers to analyze my code. I know this is probably a RTFM question, but everything I've googled turns up a cropper... (1) Does Dev C++ have a performance analyzer/profiler? How do I access it after/during compilation? (2) How are profilers typically used? Do they graph running time and/or space reqs over input size? What are some standard ways of using them to analyze your code?

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Original post by hisDudeness
Hey I am trying to get acquainted with Dev C++. I am taking a data structures course this semester and would like to use some compiler profilers to analyze my code. I know this is probably a RTFM question, but everything I've googled turns up a cropper...

(1) Does Dev C++ have a performance analyzer/profiler? How do I access it after/during compilation?


Don't know. Best I can tell you is RTFM :)

If it doesn't, and you don't mind working with command-line stuff - since Dev-C++ uses gcc to compile, you can get 'gprof' and it should integrate fairly seamlessly.

Quote:

(2) How are profilers typically used? Do they graph running time and/or space reqs over input size? What are some standard ways of using them to analyze your code?


Typically they will give you information at the function (or perhaps scope) level, saying how many times the function was called and what % of the overall CPU time was spent for those calls. You should also be able to get some 'structural' information, e.g. how many times X was called *from Y*. Your profiler may or may not include a visualizer for this information.

As for analysis, well, you have to think a little. The general idea is to look for things that stand out or seem unusual, and thus direct your attention to the parts of the code where you can get the most bang for your buck by trying to optimize things. Sometimes the "hotspots" will jump out at you, but not always.

But - does the course *require* you to do this analysis? If not, why are you expecting to need it? (I suppose it's a useful learning experience, but don't waste your time optimizing things that already run fast - your time is much more valuable than the computer's.)

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