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What Compiler should I use?

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You probably can't find a copy of a good ol' DOS compiler on the market anymore. Borland C++ 4.5 or less should work, and so should Watcom C/C++ 16-bit. So hunt around, and look for a DOS compiler.

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If you want a free DOS compiler which works pretty well I'd suggest using DJGPP. It doesn't have a great interface, but there's a tool called RHIDE for it which is similar to Borland's Turbo C++ interface.

If you don't mind spending a little money with the option of creating Windows applications then I'd suggest buying MSVC++. It's interface is the best I've used and most books/web tutorials assume that you have it, but I'm sure a Borland or a Watcom compiler could be substituted.

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One side-question. I've been looking everywhere for a Watcom compiler, but I just can't find them in the Netherlands. I own VC++...and Borland (YUCK, anybody interested in Borland C++ 4.01????)...but I want Watcom.....

can some dutch person here tell me where I can buy it?

------------------
Dance with me......

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Although I've never used it, I recommend DJGPP and RHIDE because it is good and it is free which makes it gooder.
However, if you want to compile with nostalgia (which I doubt), you can try http://community.borland.com/museum/
where Borland has, and I quote:

Old Software
These historical files are provided to the Borland community free of charge. They may be downloaded and used as is, no developer support is provided. Each individual product contains copyright notices that are still in force. These files may not be made available via the Internet or any hard copy media (e.g. diskette, CDROM). If you have any questions, feel free to contact David Intersimone at davidi@inprise.com.

Turbo Pascal v1.0,
Shipdate 20-November-1983
Turbo Pascal v3.02,
Shipdate 18-September 1986
Turbo Pascal v5.5,
Shipdate 02-May-1989

Turbo C v1.0,
Shipdate 06-July-1987
Turbo C v1.5,
Shipdate 25-January-1988
Turbo C v2.01,
Shipdate 11-May-1989

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Ok, to clear up some confusion and misinformation:

MSVC++ 6 is a good compiler....BUT does NOT compile ANY DOS programs (that's for the post that mentioned the OPTION of making win programs...it's not an OPTION).

Borland C++ 4 is not very good....but 4.5 was better. Borland C++ 4.5 was the LAST version they made which does not require Win32 to run (do not confuse with COMPILE for). Borland C++ 5.02 was the last version they made with the traditional interface, and altough it only RUNS under Win32 platforms, it still compiles for ALL of the platforms of 4.5 (16 bit DOS, DOS overlay, 16 bit Win, Win32). BUT the NEW c++ language elements (like the STL and such) are only availible as 32 bit LIBS....so anything that works in Turbo C++ 3 or Borland C++ 4.5, works in Borland C++ 5, but this does not imply all NEW additions work on old platforms.

Borland C++ Builder 4 is made for RAD windows development, but it has the complete compiler just like Borland 5 (i'm not sure about 16 bit support though), it's just hidden behind the first layer of user interface elements.

Watcom C++ is now owned by Sybase (makers of PowerBuilder and Power++) and is sold by them (last I checked). It is very hard to find, so get on the phone with them, their website does not maintain info on all products (or at least not directly accessable). Watcom C++ 11 is available, and is ALSO included in the Enterprise edition of Power++ (too expensive).

I have not used DJCPP.

For Windows development, Borland C++ Builder 4 and Visual C++ 6 are the ONLY way to go (all previous versions have horendous Standard Library implementations, and many missing features of the new language standard). BTW, I am not sure about GNU or DJCPP for windows, haven't had a chance to use them.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I recently bought The Black Art of 3d Game Programming, and all the programs in it all run in DOS. What compiler should I use to make my own programs run in DOS? The author says he used Borland C++ 4.5, but when I e-mailed him he seemed to NOT know. I've been searching for this answer for SUCH a long time, so if anyone is out there that could help, I'd truly be VERY happy! :-)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I have made several Large Games with DJGPP and it works great, It is the fastest DOS COMPILER in the world, my game runs so fast with it,(maybe its just my uncontrolably tight,compact code, HEHE) it works great, also, I have Black Art(Andre Lamothe) I would not waste the time compiling them, the demos suck crap!, i put his slow ass version of texture mapping in it and it slowed it down!! like .1 fps, it sucks, get a betta book, a DX book, or get 3D Game Programming with C++, good math basics,
later

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