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Visual C++ 6.0 "introductory edition"

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Wade are you 100% sure you bought the VC++ 6.0 edition and not VC++ 5.0? As far as I know, microsoft has three editions of their latest compiler and those are Standard, Professional, and Enterprise edition. There isn't any Introductory edition, although VC++ 5.0 and below do come in the Learning edition where you can't distribute your programs, that's why they are cheap. I bought the Standard ed, of VC++ 6.0 a year ago in November, and I don't have any message boxes pop out telling me not to distribute my programs. Unless they changed their license agreement for the Standard ed., I don't see why you can't give out your programs. Let me know if for fact you bought VC++ 6.0 or 5.0. Thanks.

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The "introductory edition" to Visual C++ 6 ships with a number of programming books, including LaMothe's "Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus". The introductory edition is crippled in that it cannot optimize code, and has that annoying nag screen. Considering that it cost almost nothing (ie. part of the cost of the book), it seems pretty reasonable to me that it doesn't come with a redistribution liscence (Microsoft don't write for charity, after all). If you decide to edit out the nag screen, just bear in mind that doing so is a breach of the product liscence.

I believe the Academic edition of VC++ 6 is crippled in the same way. In both cases MS are trying to get you to use the product - so that if you do anything serious with it, you will buy the full edition.

VC++ 5 isn't all that much worse than 6, and you can often pick up the Professional edition pretty inexpensively, now. I picked up my copy for $25!

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Umm, the Academic Edition is just the full product for a reduced price for students / teachers / schools etc. I picked up an academic edition of a MSDN Universal subscription (includes the full Visual Studio 6 and every Microsoft OS, beta Microsoft software, and the quarterly updates of the Library) for $499. As long as you have a school ID that you can use to prove you are a student, this is the only way to buy from Microsoft!

- Splat

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Alright, I know for a fact it's MS Visual C++ 6.0, it came with a beginners' programming package. I've tried using AXE Hex editor to edit out the part that talks about redistribution rights, but it screws up the program. could anybody provide me with detailed instructions, or an online tutorial relating to this? Thanks for all the help so far, and any additional help would be greatly appreciated.

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Removing that box is a violation of the copyright. If you were any kind of a programmer, then you wouldn't go about pirating software (which, in a sense you are doing). If you haven't noticed, no one really talks about pirating software. I would like to think that everyone on this site does not do this because you would be killing the market in which you would want to work in.

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Belive it or not some of us...who do program for a living...do not necessarily believe pirating is the great evil many make it out to be. MY statement is not meant to start a flame war...just to let others know there IS a dissenting opinion.

My opinion is not based on personal greed (I own Visual Studio Enterprise, Borland C++ Builder 4 Professional, and MANY older programs (BC4.5, 5.0, MASM6.11, etc.), but as a simple philosophical statement. I do not believe in the same concepts of ownwership and and rights that many others do.

I used to pirate software (before I got a nice job making it) but I didn't switch because I got morals, I switched because I got money. I do not begrudge the people out there who (for WHATEVER reason) choose to steal rather than buy my software: I have lost nothing and they have gained from my toil (the whole purpose of the work in the first place). I do HOPE that most people have the WISDOM to purchase software where they can, because in the end either enough people decide to pay for it or the company goes out of bussiness. I do not buy software becuase I feel I OWE them for services rendered, but instead primarily as an investment for continued development, AND as a personal payment for value I feel I have recieved.

If you realy think people own things and OWE other people, then clearly you have forgotten the purpose and outcome of most wars. A debt is only meaningful when paid, and a RIGHT only exists when accepted/given. If you are curious, I consider myself to be a rational anarchist in the vain of Thomas Jefferson. Good Day Good Sirs.

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