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Guest Anonymous Poster

Visual C++ 6.0 "introductory edition"

18 posts in this topic

Wade are you 100% sure you bought the VC++ 6.0 edition and not VC++ 5.0? As far as I know, microsoft has three editions of their latest compiler and those are Standard, Professional, and Enterprise edition. There isn't any Introductory edition, although VC++ 5.0 and below do come in the Learning edition where you can't distribute your programs, that's why they are cheap. I bought the Standard ed, of VC++ 6.0 a year ago in November, and I don't have any message boxes pop out telling me not to distribute my programs. Unless they changed their license agreement for the Standard ed., I don't see why you can't give out your programs. Let me know if for fact you bought VC++ 6.0 or 5.0. Thanks.
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The "introductory edition" to Visual C++ 6 ships with a number of programming books, including LaMothe's "Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus". The introductory edition is crippled in that it cannot optimize code, and has that annoying nag screen. Considering that it cost almost nothing (ie. part of the cost of the book), it seems pretty reasonable to me that it doesn't come with a redistribution liscence (Microsoft don't write for charity, after all). If you decide to edit out the nag screen, just bear in mind that doing so is a breach of the product liscence.

I believe the Academic edition of VC++ 6 is crippled in the same way. In both cases MS are trying to get you to use the product - so that if you do anything serious with it, you will buy the full edition.

VC++ 5 isn't all that much worse than 6, and you can often pick up the Professional edition pretty inexpensively, now. I picked up my copy for $25!

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Umm, the Academic Edition is just the full product for a reduced price for students / teachers / schools etc. I picked up an academic edition of a MSDN Universal subscription (includes the full Visual Studio 6 and every Microsoft OS, beta Microsoft software, and the quarterly updates of the Library) for $499. As long as you have a school ID that you can use to prove you are a student, this is the only way to buy from Microsoft!

- Splat

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Alright, I know for a fact it's MS Visual C++ 6.0, it came with a beginners' programming package. I've tried using AXE Hex editor to edit out the part that talks about redistribution rights, but it screws up the program. could anybody provide me with detailed instructions, or an online tutorial relating to this? Thanks for all the help so far, and any additional help would be greatly appreciated.
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You can't really remove the box, it's one of the cons of the learning edition. In the other editions, that box doesn't exist.
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Removing that box is a violation of the copyright. If you were any kind of a programmer, then you wouldn't go about pirating software (which, in a sense you are doing). If you haven't noticed, no one really talks about pirating software. I would like to think that everyone on this site does not do this because you would be killing the market in which you would want to work in.
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Belive it or not some of us...who do program for a living...do not necessarily believe pirating is the great evil many make it out to be. MY statement is not meant to start a flame war...just to let others know there IS a dissenting opinion.

My opinion is not based on personal greed (I own Visual Studio Enterprise, Borland C++ Builder 4 Professional, and MANY older programs (BC4.5, 5.0, MASM6.11, etc.), but as a simple philosophical statement. I do not believe in the same concepts of ownwership and and rights that many others do.

I used to pirate software (before I got a nice job making it) but I didn't switch because I got morals, I switched because I got money. I do not begrudge the people out there who (for WHATEVER reason) choose to steal rather than buy my software: I have lost nothing and they have gained from my toil (the whole purpose of the work in the first place). I do HOPE that most people have the WISDOM to purchase software where they can, because in the end either enough people decide to pay for it or the company goes out of bussiness. I do not buy software becuase I feel I OWE them for services rendered, but instead primarily as an investment for continued development, AND as a personal payment for value I feel I have recieved.

If you realy think people own things and OWE other people, then clearly you have forgotten the purpose and outcome of most wars. A debt is only meaningful when paid, and a RIGHT only exists when accepted/given. If you are curious, I consider myself to be a rational anarchist in the vain of Thomas Jefferson. Good Day Good Sirs.

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I feel any comment made on this subject will now be overshadowed by Xais previous post but getting back to the point.

There is a difference between the academic and normal retail version of software, but it's not in the code, oh no. The licences for the two products are different. If I recall correctly (most likely not) the licence for the academic version prohibits using it to make money i.e. you can not release any game you produce with it for cash. I don't know how Microsoft can tell, or even if they bother checking though (can't see that they would as it would be quite anal, but...).

If we are talking pirated software I may as well throw in my tuppence worth:

I have no moral objection to people using pirated software to see what it is like, but if they like it and decide to keep it then you've got to cough up. Like a self regulated form of Shareware. Of course it depends on everybody else thinking the same way (which they don't)

[This message has been edited by STG (edited November 25, 1999).]

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Why not just ignore it ?

Run something like Basta's Buzzoff (I think it is called)? It will automatically push the button of the stupid dlg box. (Windows PowerPro can do this and much more for that matter... come to that, there are bound to be others (: )

------------------
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Robert Kelly IV (aka Feral Trobar)
Feral@FireTop.Com
FireTop.Com
http://FireTop.Com
For information email Info@FireTop.Com

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INFORMATION SHOULD BE FREE TO ALL

EVERYONE SHOULD BE ABLE TO OWN EVERYTHING PIECE OF SOFTWARE THEY WANT IF THEY TAKE THE TIME TO PIRATE IT, THEY WILL NOT LOSE MONEY BECAUSE PEOPLE WHO PIRATE THE SOFTWARE WERE NEVER GOING TO BUY IT, AND NO ONE ELSE IS GOING TO GO OUT OF THERE WAY TO LEARNE HOW TO IF THEY COULD JUST SPEND A COUPLE OF BUCKS, SO JUS LEAVE IT AT THAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

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My god, what is this board coming to? I think we may need to implement only registered users posting...

Anyway, to elegantly refute this argument (and without, I might add, all capitals), everyone must understand that software is not merely information, it is work. Work that many people put hours of their life into. To deprive them of their due profit (which they really deserve, since quality software is almost a rarity) is not the way things should be. The rationalization that pirating software is not bad because the pirator would never have bought the software in the first place is the most used rationalization in existance. Although this may be true (Photoshop, for example) in some cases in some circumstances in totally educational and completely non-profit purposes, the truth is that the person would have bought the software HAD HE NOT BEEN OF THE MINDSET THAT SOFTWARE CAN AND SHOULD BE FREE.

Anyway, software piracy is a big issue, and this anonymous coward's all capital, poorly worded scream is not helping.

Also, if that IP is not from a modem pool or other shared range, just ban it please. Not to censor, but morons like that need to learn that the anonymity of the Internet is not an excuse.

- Splat

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Just find a local computer show and buy another edition. I picked up Visual C++ 6 professional edition for $28 at a local computer,show, and I know what you're thinking, and NO it was not pirated.

Good luck,
Nomad

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First of all, I was just trying to get the point accross that many people believe. Also, Its against the law to ban messages from one ip(Freedom of Speech), also, any idiot could esaily get around this by going through other computers. Thats not the point. The point is that people that pirate software, do it for a reason, they can not buy the software. And for the thing about how many hours people put into it. The programmers still get paid, and to remind yo, linux and every other open soure software has just as much hard work put into it and everything should be like it.

I wrote in all CAPS caus i wanted to get the point accross, and help all those old programers that are past there prime sumtin ta look at, K

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hey, I agree with Mitnick Brother, software should be free, and its just easier to not reagister,god these idiots, like im going to waste all that time, anyway, that would not give yo anymore info on anyone. AND YOU CANT BLOCK ANY IPS, and if you can please try to block mine. i no idiot, even though its probabaly against the law and a suable subject.
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I recently bought Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 introductory edition, mainly due to financial constraints, and there's a problem.

When I run a program I've written, it pops up with a dialog box that says I cannot redistribute any executables that I created with this product. I have to click OK before my program will run. Is there any way to remove this box, I can't find it in the header files, program file, or resource files.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks.

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Just so you know: There is no right to speech on a privately owned board, we can delete and revoke priveldges from anyone who abuses the boards and makes it an unpleasant place to be.

Also, we do not condone piracy, and will not be allowing people to discuss methods for pirating or getting around the limitations on free/shareware software here.

Finally, no one makes up the rules for OTHER people in a free society, beyond saying that you cant infringe upon each others rights and defining what those are. Which means that if people decide to charge for software, thats their right. If you dont like it, dont use their software.

This thread is closed as its going nowhere and shouldnt have really been gone into in the first place.

-Geoff

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