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Making the jump from text to graphics

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I've been programming for quite a while (okay, 2 months, but that seems like quite a while to me...its not 5 years, but I didn't start yesterday) Anyways, I was wondering if there was a good book or a few good tutorials/practice exercises to help me make the transition from dos programming to windows and graphics, etc. I've done a few text-based games, but I'd love to move on to bigger and better things. I did the tetris-clone tutorial in the "links" thread here, which helped a little although I'd need something with a little more explanation to everything. Don't get me wrong, it was a great tutorial. I'd really like to find something to help me get into windows and graphic programming. Especially 2D. I'd love to do a 2D platformer or a 2D overhead adventure/RPG. Any tips or recommendations?

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Allegro and SDL are two great 2D Graphics libraries. They are mainly compatible with C and C++, but SDL can be used with some others. OpenGL, while mainly a 3D API, is compable of some two-dimensional graphics. DirectX is the same case as OpenGL. It is made of a few things, specifically(is that spelled right?) Direct3D, but is also made of DirectDraw for 2D graphics. OpenGL mainly focuses on C and C++, but it can be used with many other languages as well. DirectX is, I think, for C# and only C#. There is also PyGame, if you're using Python.
There are many other less noticed graphics libraries.

I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Annoyer

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I would suggest Beginning Game Programming by Michael Morrison. The book doesn't go into detail on how it draws the objects, but it give a good amount of the theory for programming 2-d games and you actually get to make complete games. It also uses some advance concepts like pointers, but you don't have to understand the items to go through the book.

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Quote:

the transition from dos programming to windows and graphics, etc.


Permit me to be pedantic for a moment: you have never programmed for DOS. You have written Windows applications that happen to appear in a command-prompt (commonly misnamed a "DOS box"). You did this by calling to the standard C and/or C++ libraries, which are in fact implemented in terms of the Windows OS's "character mode" API for writing console applications.

You'd need an entirely separate compiler to write programs for DOS; Visual C++ does not support it any more.

Quote:

DirectX is, I think, for C# and only C#.


DirectX is a COM API; it can be used from just about any language with the appropriate support. It is most commonly used from C++, and indirectly from C# via Managed DirectX or XNA.

SDL seems pretty popular, you (Demos) might want to look into that.

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I would really reccommend SDL as well. It is much simpler and intuitive than Win32 (which is what that tetris tutorial uses). I am using it for a 2D side scroller, and the graphics part was pretty trivial to code.

As a bonus, it is portable to about every computer system under the sun.

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Quote:
Original post by jpetrie
Quote:

DirectX is, I think, for C# and only C#.


DirectX is a COM API; it can be used from just about any language with the appropriate support. It is most commonly used from C++, and indirectly from C# via Managed DirectX or XNA.

SDL seems pretty popular, you (Demos) might want to look into that.


Okay, I wasn't sure of that, as I said "I Think".

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With all this talk about this "SDL", where would I find something on it?
i see this book here
http://www.gamedev.net/columns/books/bookdetails.asp?productid=206
is there a more recent book or version on it? or has the syntax and functionality not changed since it was published in November, '02?

I'm kinda working on building a library, so buying a book doesn't bother me.

From the reviews, this is what I'm looking for to bridge the gap between the "cmd window" world and 2d graphics and games.

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